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John Green And J.K. Rowling Do Not Cast Movies, Okay? Okay

Your favorite authors really don't have a say in who gets cast.

No one knows the proverbial pains of casting cinematic adaptations of popular books more than John Green. The "Looking For Alaska" author has been pummeled with impassioned tweets ever since it was announced Paramount was moving forward with a big screen adaptation of his aforementioned first novel.

Earlier this summer, Nerdfighters went on a rampage when he made a comment that Taylor Swift might be a good match as the titular character in the movie. Green was on the receiving end of so many visceral Internet ~feelings~ that he later clarified that he has no real say in casting.

Now it appears that those fervent fans are at it again, following the rumors that Elle Fanning was circling the fan-fave role. So, once again Green took to Twitter to clarifying some things.

As it turns out, Green's frustration struck a chord with "Harry Potter" scribe J.K. Rowling, who undoubtedly must have been feeling a similar sentiment in the wake of the "Harry Potter and the Cursed Child" casting that set social media ablaze Sunday night. She cheekily replied, "Nobody. Ever. Believes. That."

"Harry Potter and the Cursed Child" recently announced that actors Jamie Parker, Noma Dumezweni and Paul Thornley will star in the West End play next year as Harry, Hermione, and Ron, respectively -- and people had feelings about it. While Dumezweni's casting was mostly met with a giant roar of applause from fans, as this means the fandom's years-long push for a brown-skinned Hermione has officially been made canon, some were no so enthusiastic about the news. (Those people are obviously Slytherins.)

However, Green, being the perfect Hufflepuff that he is, couldn't have been happier with the casting.

Rowling gave the credit to "Cursed Child" director John Tiffany, who cast her first three picks in the iconic roles of Harry, Hermione and Ron.

Writes may have a say in who they'd like to see inhabit the part, but at the end of the day, it's the director who makes the final choice.