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Kanye West And Weezer Sound Amazing Mashed Up Together

Thanks to 'The Buddy Holly Workout Plan,' I'm the envy of all my friends.

A decade ago, Danger Mouse melted faces with The Grey Album, the much-celebrated blending of Jay Z's verses The Black Album and music from The Beatles' "White Album." It was genius. And now, it's happening again -- kind of.

Alex Hodowanec, a sophomore at Ohio State University, has created the next logical step in the rap/rock mash-up lineage: Yeezer. Yes, that's Kanye West mashed up with Weezer over the course of 10 clever songs.

As Hodowanec tells Radio.com, it all started with one simple track: "Through The Hills," which he created from Yeezy's raps on "Through The Wire" (yep, the one he recorded about his jaw being wired shut) and Weezer's supercharged playing on "Beverly Hills" ("the most iconic Weezer song," he thinks). And to Hodowanec's surprise, the two worked extremely well together.

"Once that first song clicked, I thought, you might as well just go for nine more, right?" he said.

Among those nine are "Bound 2 Smile," a recasting of Kanye's swaggering "Bound 2" as a legit power-pop anthem (that wisely keeps the "uh-huh honey" interjections) and "Back To Nothing," another electric guitar-infused gem that seems to sparkle with Kanye's vocal rhythm glossing the top of it. These are the absolute best ones, the demonstrations of awesomeness in a project that could've been a total disaster from the get-go, in everything but name, that is. The title, Yeezer, is perfect, even if it came about as a joke from Hodowanec's friend.

Yeezer is less fun when the song pairings are a little bit of a stretch, like "The Buddy Holly Workout Plan" -- a combo with very good intentions that just doesn't connect as immediately as the others -- and "(And They) Say It Ain't So," which tries to shoehorn the raucous SNL version of "Power" into a sweet '90s rock song about daddy issues. Good try, though. For real.

Seeing as how we still haven't heard SWISH, it's possible that it's actually a rock album and that Ye's time locked in rooms making five beats a day for three summers are over. I mean, "FourFiveSeconds" exists, so who knows?

For right now, throw up that "W" (or that "Y," I guess) and blast Yeezer. Loud.