Drake Changes Up His ‘Rap Flow’ On NWTS‘s ‘Worst Behaviour’

'His pocket is different; his rap flow is kind of crazy on that one,' Drake's newest producer DJ Dahi tells MTV News.

DJ Dahi has been flying under the radar for a few years now, but when Drake officially drops Nothing Was the Same on the September 24, the Los Angeles producer can expect requests for his beats to grow exponentially.

Dahi produced “Worst Behaviour,” the rambunctious fire-starter that let Drizzy show his bad side. Not only does he toss his middle finger to police in the first few bars, Drake playfully throws shots at his teenage acting days. “This ain’t the son you raised who used to take the Acura at 5 a.m. to go and shoot Degrassi up at Morningside,” he rhymes as if he’s speaking directly to his mom.

“Motherf—ers never loved us,” Drizzy shouts on the hook, calling out all of his detractors who didn’t believe he’d ever make it.

“It’s dope because it’s different from what Drake has ever done to me I think, sonically,” Dahi told MTV News on Tuesday (September 17). “His pocket is different; his rap flow is kind of crazy on that one.”

Dahi has a few notable credits under his production belt. He made the beat for “Sexting” from Schoolboy Q’s 2012 indie album Habits & Contradictions and “Money Trees” from Kendrick Lamar’s platinum-selling good kid, m.A.A.d city, but this placement on Nothing Was the Same figures to raise his profile significantly.

Dahi estimates that he made the beat in mid-August and after his manager sent the beat to the OVO camp things started to come together. The up-and-coming beat general wasn’t present when Drake laid his verses over his frantic drum roll, nor was he there when YMCMB producer Detail added the auto-tuned ad-libs, but when he first heard the track two weeks ago he was impressed with how it all turned out.

“I feel like I got a lucky one because usually you just want to be in the process of the record, but at least I had a great foundation so when Drake had it and Detail did what he did to the joint it kind of just came together,” he said. “He was tellin’ me that he needed something… that was going to be a different format for him. The process of him making the record was liberating, vindicating in some sense and it’s cool to a part of that.”


Mentally been many places, but I'm Brooklyn's own. Hip-hop gives me life!
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