Frank Ocean Spans The Globe In ‘Lost’ Video

Odd Future crooner makes travelogue clip to go with his international song.

Some singers go for high-concept videos full of special effects and hard-to-follow story lines. Not Frank Ocean. The Odd Future star likes to keep it simple. Which is why the just-dropped Francisco Soriano-directed clip for his song “Lost” is pretty much the perfect visual compliment to the tune’s chorus.

“Miami, Amsterdam, Tokyo, Spain, Los Angeles, India/Lost on a train/Lost,” he sings on the Channel Orange track. And, wouldn’t you know it? The three-minute video pretty much takes you on a global trek as Ocean fills up his passport with stamps from one exotic locale after another.

It opens with the requisite shot of clouds from the inside of a plane and images of Ocean taking a hike in the Los Angeles hills as he makes his way to the airport. In short order he’s at the pyramids in Egypt and hitting the stage as a split screen shows him chilling on a balcony in Paris with the iconic Arc de Triomphe in the background.

Then it’s back on a plane, up in the air and on to another moving walkway as he appears to touch down in Miami, judging by the swaying palm trees in the frame. The clip is kind of a home video of Ocean’s crazy year, interspersed with clips of him in the recording studio singing and playing piano, as he makes his way to Tokyo and beyond in a “if it’s Tuesday, it must be Dubai” blur of shows, sightseeing, cab rides and shopping.

Like any decent musical tourist, he serves up some arty shots of the Eiffel Tower, stops for a few photo ops with fans, visits museums and dips into studios when he’s not enjoying the high life with Odd Future ringleader Tyler, the Creator.

It all becomes a blur of shows, limos, more shows and staring wistfully out of the backseat window as he moves on to the next one. The final image has a spent-looking Ocean closing his eyes as the sun sets behind the iconic sail-shaped Burj Al Arab luxury hotel in Dubai.

Not bad work if you can get it.

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