Chief Keef Gets Support From Fellow Chi-Town MC King Louie

As Sosa is released from prison, King L tells MTV News 'I just wanna see the lil fool grow.'

King L is plenty busy at SXSW Music Festival putting in work for his #MarchMadness campaign, in which he and his Lawless cohorts drop a new song every day for the month of March. But in the midst of all the frenzy, King Louie’s collaborator and fellow Chicago MC Chief Keef, who has been incarcerated since January for violating his probation, will be released from jail Thursday (March 14).

“I just wanna see the lil fool grow, I want the best for him,” King L told MTV News about Sosa’s impending release, after he wrapped up an interview with Shade 45′s “Sway in the Morning” radio show on SiriusXM. “You gotta understand where we come from. That little time … that don’t overweigh the positive that went on, so I just go with the positive and don’t really think about the negative.”

The Finally Rich MC was ordered to serve 60 days in juvenile detention after a judge ruled that a June 2012 video interview where the teen was seen handling firearms at a gun range was a direct violation of his 18-month probation stemming from gun charges in which he was convicted for pointing a gun at a police officer.

Louie, who recently signed to Sony/Epic based on the Chi town buzz started by the GBE frontman, revealed that he hadn’t spoken to the embattled rapper born Keith Cozart yet, but empathized with the plight the “Love Sosa” rapper will face while rehabbing his image after his release.

“At the end of the day, when you talk about him, you talk about a superstar, a star, so I don’t think they labeled him wrong,” he said. “It’s just the people that ain’t rocking with it that labeled him that (bad), so that’s my lil dude. Sosa like a year ago he wasn’t rich, bro. This man, he rich now. Ain’t nothing else like your family taken care of. So it’s like when people talk about all the music and the content you gotta think about where we come from. Like, what else we supposed to talk about?”

Until he gets an opportunity to chop it up with his fellow Chicagoan, who famously shouted him out in the incendiary street anthem, “I Don’t Like,” King L will be taking in the sights and sounds that Austin’s not-so-indie-anymore music festival offers.

“These people so nice out here,” King said. “They come out for the music. It’s not like you being at a show and everybody being too cool to rap the words and everything or even participate in the show. Everybody come down here for participation and just support, so I love it.”