‘American Idol’ Coin Toss Shows Crystal And Lee’s Bond, Friend Says

'It really seemed like they weren't worried about the order,' Bowersox's pal says of coin toss to determine finale performance order.

You hear it every year: The top-two finalists on “American Idol” are really close pals and neither cares who wins the competition. They said it last year with Kris Allen and Adam Lambert , who roomed together and genuinely seemed to be pulling for and supporting each other, and it appears to be the case again this year with Lee DeWyze and Crystal Bowersox.

Except for the full-body hug Bowersox laid on an unsuspecting DeWyze on Wednesday when she realized she’d be competing with him in the finale, it’s been a bit hard to tell what kind of relationship the pair have.

A friend of Bowersox’s who attended the show last week got a chance to see host Ryan Seacrest flip a coin following Wednesday night’s results show and said the off-camera scene offered a glimpse into how close these two singers have become since they met at last summer’s Chicago auditions. According to USA Today, Seacrest flipped a coin that had Crystal’s face on one side and Lee’s on the other to determine the performance order for Tuesday night’s (May 25) final sing-off. Crystal won the toss, and her friend said what happened next spoke volumes about their relationship.

“Like she said on the show, it doesn’t really matter who wins at this point,” her friend told MTV News. “They auditioned together in Chicago, and they’ve been friends ever since. They genuinely like each other, and when she won the coin toss, she said, ‘I don’t care — what do you think?’ And he said the same thing, and it really seemed like they weren’t worried about the order.”

For the record, Bowersox agreed to let Lee go first — which “Idol” watchers said was a smart move.

Do you think Lee and Crystal will really be happy no matter the outcome? Let us know in the comments!

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