Is Chris Brown's 'Famous Girl' About Rihanna?

Song's lyrics certainly seem to address Brown's split with Rihanna.

While their albums are being released just weeks apart, former couple [artist id="1961441"]Chris Brown[/artist] and [artist id="1940303"]Rihanna[/artist] have been making similar promotional rounds recently, with both talking about his February assault on her as well as their LPs. And based on a listen to one of the songs on Brown's upcoming effort, Graffiti — which drops on Tuesday but is available on MTV's The Leak right now

— it appears the 20-year-old singer may be speaking much more explicitly about their relationship in his lyrics than he has in the interviews he's done to date.

Given the attention surrounding Brown's attack on Rihanna and his subsequent guilty plea to felony assault in June, it's not surprising that emotions and turmoil from the incident would spill into the albums, as Rihanna has said of Rated R. And while much of Graffiti is devoted to Brown's typical come-ons to the ladies, the old-school-style R&B track "Famous Girl" features a string of provocative lyrics that had blogs and fans chattering as soon as it debuted on The Leak on Tuesday.

After making a reference in the second verse to Young Money rapper [artist id="2545682"]Drake[/artist] and the rumored romance between him and Rihanna ("While we're on Drake/ Say that you're the best he's ever had") — a romance Drake was quick to deny — Brown alludes to "rumors coming" and says he "knows what you keep in shadow."

The singer gets more explicit in the chorus, when he croons, "Since I thought I found my woman/ There were other guys who thought the same thing about it/ Like damn, you let me down, down, down/ 'Cause you're famous, girl, for breaking hearts."

Given the public nature of the couple's breakup and Brown's reluctance to discuss what happened on the night of the assault or what led to the breakdown of their relationship, he gets surprisingly detailed in the second verse, when he quotes a Keri Hilson song ("Keri would've said my love knocks her down"), then nods to Keyshia Cole and Beyoncé tunes with the line "Keyshia would've told me I was sent from heaven/ Sorry, B, I don't wear no halo"). He also seems to suggest that violence between them went both ways ("You were the first to play the game, though") and appears to fess up to a reported earlier violent incident in which he allegedly smashed the window of a car the then-couple were driving after a heated argument ("Sorry I bust the windows out your car"), in this case Jazmine Sullivan's "Bust Your Windows."

Elsewhere in the song, Brown admits, "I might have cheated at the beginning," and cryptically says, "I was wrong for writing 'Disturbia,' " a seeming reference to the Rihanna track of that name, which he co-wrote. He then sings (referencing one of his own songs), "But I meant it in 'Forever'/ We were supposed to be together/ And I can't let you go." He also later owns up to that fact that "Yes I'm famous, girl, for breaking hearts ... didn't know I'd break your heart."

Brown has not yet discussed the song publicly, but he appears to come to grips with the ugly split near the end, when he sings, "Many hearts we should have left unbroken/ Empty words are better left unspoken/ Too much pressure, I wish I was frozen/ Seems we lost our way/ Now I hope you're happy being famous, girl."

A rep for Brown had not granted MTV News' request for comment at press time.

Rihanna has said that a number of the dark songs on her Rated R album deal with the "roller coaster" of emotions she felt in the wake of Brown's assault, referring to the disc as her "mini-movie" for its display of raw honesty and vulnerability. And, she too appears to make direct reference to their relationship on songs like the Ne-Yo-penned "Stupid in Love," on which she sings, "I still love you, but I can't do this/ I may be dumb but I'm not stupid."