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We Revisited Iconic Scenes From A Legendary Tupac Video For His B-Day

Happy birthday, 'Pac!

Tupac Shakur's footprints are still making an impact.

The rapper - who would've turned 44 on Tuesday, Jun. 16 - is still one of the most beloved MCs of all time and it's been nineteen years since his tragic death. So, to celebrate the legendary rapper's life and legacy, we revisited scenes from his iconic "To Live and Die in L.A." music video.

By following the late great's footsteps, we were able to take photos of some landmarks that appear in the clip. They show how some things have changed since 'Pac's passing and how some have stayed the same. Take a trip through L.A. with us below.

Slauson Swapmeet/Super Mall

Then:

Now

Andres Tardio/MTV

This is a legendary spot. You might remember Dr. Dre bragging about having a stolen VCR from here on 1992's "The Day The Ni--az Took Over". Other MCs, including Game, Ras Kass, and Murs, have mentioned this location on songs too.

As you can see, the "swap meet" has become a "super mall," but otherwise, not much has changed. And yes, you can still get some pretty good deals here.

Estrada Courts' 'We Are Not A Minority' Mural

Then:

Now:

Andres Tardio/MTV

This isn't just a mural. It's also a home. The piece - which features revolutionary icon Che Guevara - was made in 1978 to decorate Estrada Courts, a low-income housing project in Los Angeles. It was repainted by muralists in the mid-'90s, according to Mural Conservancy. And it's as striking today as it was when 'Pac shared it with us in '96.

Crenshaw Square

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Now:

Andres Tardio/MTV News

You can't miss Crenshaw Square in "To Live and Die in L.A." And you can't miss that sign in real life either. Crenshaw Square has everything from a nail and hair salon to a hat store to a "divorce clinic." It's relatively close to the Baldwin Hills Crenshaw Plaza, where 'Pac shot some of his video scenes in. And that leads us to...

Baldwin Hills Crenshaw Plaza

Then:

Tupac

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Andres Tardio/MTV

'Pac used this Plaza as a backdrop for "To Live and Die in L.A." in 1996. Today, it's updated (as you can see) and it's full of posters promoting the upcoming BET Experience, which is set to include Kendrick Lamar.

K. Dot hasn't been shy about Pac's influence. Driving through here, I saw their connection as a sign that nearly 20 years after his passing, Shakur's still making his mark - and sometimes it's through other MCs.

Roscoe's Chicken & Waffles

Then:

Tupac

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Andres Tardio/MTV

If you want tasty fried chicken and toasty waffles, this is your spot.

Roscoe's House of Chicken and Waffles has become a staple in L.A. It's even been name-checked by the likes of Nate Dogg, Game, Tyga, YG and Murs. Why? It's likely because the food here is delicious. It's also a major part of the "To Live and Die in L.A." video. I mean, it is the backdrop for an epic food fight.

Hollywood Sign

Then:

Tupac

Now:

Andres Tardio/MTV

Does it get more iconic than this? The Hollywood Sign shows up in the opening scene of "To Live and Die in L.A." Want this view? You can fly by in chopper. Otherwise, you have to drive down some winding roads, pass by super expensive homes and fight off many eager tourists like I did here, but it's definitely worth it.

Driving to each of these locations, it became more and more clear that Tupac's legacy is still as strong as it's ever been. And his footprints - whether through his music or his videos - are still helpful to follow.

Happy birthday, Pac!