Pink + Punk = Plenty Of Spunk On Upcoming Try This

November 11 release dominated by roughed-up rock songs.

Surprise — it's a rock record! Pink started getting in touch with her inner rock chick on Missundaztood, thanks to songwriting partner Linda Perry, but for her latest effort, Pink's got a punker aboard, and it shows.

Rancid frontman Tim Armstrong is all over Pink's upcoming third release, Try This (see "Pink Trying Out Try This As Title Of Next LP"), and the bulk of the album bears his mark.

Eight out of 13 songs are roughed-up rockers, about going out ("Tonight's the Night"), getting in trouble ("Trouble"), getting stood up ("The Last to Know"), getting burnt out from partying too hard (the Janis Joplin ode "Unwind"), and getting out of town ("Humble Neighborhood") — nothing as revealing or personal as the material on Missundaztood, but no less satisfying (see "Pink Won't Be 'Yapping About Her Problems' On New LP, Linda Perry Says").

"Trouble," the first single off the November 11 release, sets the tone of Pink's new direction. Introduced by a spunky, chunky descending guitar riff, the song finds Pink gleefully anticipating getting disorderly and issuing a blanket warning to anyone in hearing range: "You think you're right, but you were wrong/ You tried to take me, but I knew all along/ You can't take me for a ride/ I'm not a fool, no/ So you'd better run and hide/ ... If you see me coming down the street, then you know it's time to go/ 'Cause here comes trouble."

A little more funky, "Tonight's the Night" is a "Get the Party Started" sequel with organ accompaniment and the boast: "Tonight's the night I'm going to get wrecked/ ... I might end up in jail, I really don't care."

Where Pink does seem to care is on what she's been calling her first love songs — the Heart-like Perry rocker "Waiting for Love" and the gauzy "Love Song," the latter of which was co-written with and produced by Dionne Warwick's son, Damian Elliott.

Despite the addition of love songs to her repertoire, the most emotive song on Try This is "Last to Know," a rager about inviting a new beau to a show where the guest list was so tight that she had to turn down her own mother. And then he doesn't even bother to come. "You could've called me up to say good luck/You could've called me back, you stupid f---," she cries.

The moving "Save My Life," while sung in a more gentle tone, is also a hard hitter. In it, Pink tells the tale of a girl who seemed to have everything but threw it all away by getting "back on drugs" and was only now realizing she needs help. Her dilemma, obviously more serious than the one described with so much rage in "Last to Know," isn't described in a preachy way, but seems filtered from the perspective of a former lover, giving the song a bittersweet quality.

Not all songs on Try This are purely rock, though. Pink continues to genre-hop on a torchy '70s-like ballad ("Catch Me While I'm Sleeping"), a dancefloor burner with a live feel to it ("God Is a DJ"), and a raunchy meeting of the minds with X-rated beatmaster Peaches ("Oh My God").

Meanwhile, the video for "Trouble," set to premiere on MTV later this month, was shot two weeks ago on a ranch in Newhall, California, where "Little House on the Prairie" was once filmed, with the idea to make a punk-rock western. Pink rides into a Wild West town on a horse, ostensibly to free the townspeople from the clutches of an evil sheriff, or, as people on the set described it, "to kick some ass." Jeremy Renner ("S.W.A.T.") plays the sheriff, while the Pussycat Dolls are the town's barmaids.

"The joke was that Pink was there to free the horses and the 'hos," a rep for director Sophie Muller said.

"Making the Video: Pink" airs September 29 at 4:30 p.m.