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 "Brokeback   Mountain"

 "Get Rich or Die   Tryin' "

 "Elizabethtown"

 "Me and You And   Everyone We Know"

 "Thumbsucker"

 "The Matador"


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Me and You and Everyone We Know

"I'm going to live each day like it's my last," writer, director and co-star Miranda July mutters at the start of her debut feature, "Me and You and Everyone We Know." Now, imagine being inspired well beyond the limits of that trite sentiment, and you'll begin to appreciate the wondrous innocence conveyed by "Me and You ..." and, as intensely, by its accompanying soundtrack.

The score by "Donnie Darko" composer Michael Andrews (who notably transformed Tears for Fears' innocuous "Mad World" into not only a haunting piano finale for "Darko," but a smash U.K. hit) evokes an inquisitive, imaginative world, but without resorting to the sort of musical handholding employed by so many scores. (Feel sad here. Feel anxious there.) What's unique about Andrews' electronic twinkling is that, rather than merely underscoring motivation or emotions, the music acts as a changeable mood drifting, dreamlike, in and out of the story's consciousness — the musical equivalent of lying on your back in the grass, watching clouds roll by. (The free-floating atmosphere is reinforced by the sighing, expressive vocals of indie L.A. singer/songwriter Inara George; Andrews produced her solo debut, last year's All Rise.)

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Pop songs do show up, at times, but (thankfully) they're utilized with discretion and sincerity. When Cody Chesnutt sings a lullaby ("5 On a Joyride") while a teenager is fellated for the first time or Spiritualized serenades a young child caught up in a risqué Internet relationship ("Any Way That You Want Me"), the moments aren't played for laughs; they transcend their apparent irony. Andrews does a wonderful job of making his electronic pulsations sound wistful, but genuine melancholy arrives with the denouement — the classic '80s left-field oddity, Virginia Astley's "A Summer Long Since Past" — creating a deep, autumnal yearning as the credits roll. — Rodrigo Perez


NEXT: James Montgomery on 'Thumbsucker'
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Photos: Miramax/Focus Features/Paramount/Sony Classics/IFC/Samuel Goldwyn


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