728x90 DART richIframeInline(S). pagename: movies













back  
One of the things that Wilson and company helped to create is a warm heart beating somewhere just up and to the right of the film's ample beer gut. As Beanie — the film's loud, fast-talking, commitment-phobic hustler — Vaughn displays a caring and sense of dedication to the very things he claims to be anchored to.

Sure, he drags his young son to Mitch's bachelor pad while cooking up plans for an unofficial fraternity, but Beanie takes great (and hilarious) pains to make sure that profanity doesn't reach his son's ears. He also stages a sprawling birthday party for the boy, complete with games, a petting zoo and Beanie himself in full clown garb. But Beanie's most telling moment comes during the heat of one of the parties that he's pushed so hard for, when all of his braggadocio melts away to reveal the committed family man underneath.

"I wanted that scene in there," Vaughn said. "I thought it's a nice scene to have because I'm very ambitious and I'm encouraging [Mitch] to be around girls and I kind of allude that I will, but I'm also married with a kid. I thought it was cool that when push came to shove, he's not that tempted."

 'Old School' Clip
Frank vs. the beer bong
Even Ferrell, easily the film's king clown and most manic madman, gets to display his sensitive side. Ferrell's regression into his college persona of "Frank the Tank" is the film's richest gag and opens the door for the comedian to dive headfirst into the film's most over-the-top behavior. For Frank (as for most), the roles of "party monster" and "family man" can't exactly co-exist smoothly, so Ferrell has to navigate his newlywed character through some tender scenes with his wife, a prospect that was a bit daunting for the "Saturday Night Live" alum.

"There were real moments where I'd be in my car driving to the set going, 'I cannot do this. I will not be able to deliver.' But I did," Ferrell said. "Todd said, 'This will be fun because it will be a different thing for you to do.' And I agree. That was the challenge of it."

For most of Frank the Tank's other challenges (smashing his head through a pane of glass, catching fire, etc.), Ferrell left the heavy work to his stunt double, Joe Bucaro. But Ferrell was up for his own streaking, as well as some of Frank's other less grueling feats.

 'I was told to never pass up a bottle of Olde English 800.' — Will Ferrell
"Does it count as a stunt that he actually did get intoxicated during the party scene? Does that count as a stunt?" Wilson joked. "His wife had to come and pick him up at the end of the workday. Will was trying to pick up his own wife. I overheard him telling his wife, 'You know, I have a house in the hills.' And she was like, 'Will, it's time to go, honey.' He was like, 'Wherever you want to take me, baby.' "

"I was told to never pass up a bottle of Olde English 800," Ferrell deadpanned.

Consider it another sign of the cult of Frank. The Tank has a way of rubbing off on people, which may not be the worst thing in the world. He is arguably the most magnetic character in the film, easily the most frantic and perhaps the one who can teach us the most valuable lessons — streaking should be a group activity, a tranquilizer gun is not a toy and never drink out of a funnel.

It's no surprise that, when asked about the film's message, Vaughn's thoughts turn not to his own character, but to Frank at perhaps his most poignant.

"Keep on truckin'," Vaughn offered.

Well put, friend. Well put.




Check out MTV Movies for more from Hollywood.

E-Mail this story to a friend

What do you think of this feature? You Tell Us...
back
Photo: DreamWorks Pictures


120x600 DART richInline(S). pagename: movies


© 2007 MTV NETWORKS. © AND TM MTV NETWORKS. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. TERMS OF USE, USER CONTENT SUBMISSION AGREEMENTCOPYRIGHT POLICY  and  PRIVACY STATEMENT/YOUR CA PRIVACY RIGHTADVERTISING OPPORTUNITIES E-COMMERCE ON THIS WEBSITE IS BROUGHT TO YOU BY MTVN DIRECT INC.