Next month, Blink-182 will mark the 10-year anniversary of their self-titled (or Untitled) album by playing it in its entirety at a pair of shows in Los Angeles.

It's a fitting tribute to an album that, in the decade since it was first released, has become a bit of a touchstone — a defining moment not just for the band, but for the genre of punk, in all its permutations. Which is why it's odd to hear Blink bassist Mark Hoppus admit that the band originally had no intentions of marking Untitled's anniversary at all ... until someone reminded him about it on Twitter.

"Someone on Twitter @-replied to me, pointing out that the 10-year anniversary of the album was approaching. That was maybe three weeks ago," Hoppus wrote in an email to MTV News. "So I emailed Travis and Tom, suggesting that we could perform the whole album live. It all came together very quickly. I've been re-learning the bass parts and rehearsing alone in my house here in London ... Some of these songs we've never performed live."

And though Blink recently celebrated their 20th anniversary with a lengthy tour, the idea of Untitled turning 10 is one Hoppus is still having a difficult time wrapping his head around ... then again, he's had plenty of practice coming to terms with his band's longevity on their recent run of shows.

"I can't believe it's been 10 years now. I can still remember conversations we had while recording that album, word-for-word," he wrote. "But I love where our band is right now. We're lucky enough to straddle actively working on new music, with also having people at shows singing songs we wrote 20 years ago. It's amazing to me that people still come to Blink-182 shows as their first concert."

Yet, for all the memories he's shared with both fans and his bandmates in recent years, Hoppus says that he's counting the days until he gets to perform Untitled in full ... and honor its legacy once and for all.

"That album changed everything for Blink-182. The way we write songs, the manner in which we record them, the way we think of ourselves as a band, everything. It marked a huge turning point in our career," he wrote. "I think it changed the way people thought of us, too. We were no longer the silly skate punk kids from California. Well, we were — and we still are — but from then on there was something more."