Kendrick Lamar challenged his peers to step up their game on his "Control" verse, and Meek Mill accepted, snapping back with his response on "Ooh Kill Em." But apparently that was only the beginning.

On Tuesday night, K. Dot had something to say about Meek's track during a show in Brooklyn. And the MMG rapper got wind of it pretty quickly.

On "Ooh Kill Em," Meek challenged Kendrick's claim of being the 'king of New York,' rapping, "Hov gave you 24, let you have that / Man, you claiming you the king of New York / What the f--- wrong with you n---a? snap back / Hundred shots, aimin' straight at your snap cap / Everybody want the crown till I snatch that."

Kendrick wasn't feeling that. "I been doing this sh-- for years, I mastered this sh--," Kendrick reportedly told a crowd at Williamsburg Park in Brooklyn. "I have no time for irrelevant n---as [or] new n---as."

And if there was any doubt that he was including Meek in those statements, he specifically referenced the Philly rapper's recent single "Levels." There's one n---a in particular that needs to realize that there's 'levels' to this sh--. I'm motherf---in' King Kendrick."

Naturally, news of Kendrick's shout-out reached Meek pretty quickly and he took to Twitter to respond. First, he posed his question to fans and then directed it right at the Compton rapper.

"King of what? Somebody tell me please," Meek tweeted.

When MTV News spoke to Meek on Monday, he revealed what sparked the Ooh Kill Em" track. "Kendrick made a statement where he wanted to be competitive, so I made it competitive," he said. "I could do that all day, so I just wanted to start it off and let him know — let's play. I like having fun; I love to rap, so it's fun to me."

Meek also explained that he'd run into the TDE rapper during a Jay Z party over the Made in America festival weekend, where he exchanged a few words with Lamar.

"I said, 'I just gotta figure out how I'm gonna [come at you], because the way you came it wasn't in a disrespectful way,' " Meek recalled of their conversation. "I'm from Philly, when somebody comes at you, they come at you in a very disrespectful way, like they're gonna kill your mother in their raps and all types of stuff," he joked. "So I was just thinking of a way I could keep it respectful, but still talk that work so you know that I mean business."