Miley Cyrus took her traveling twerk show to Germany this week, and somewhere in-between butt-tweeting a personal conversation with someone named FEFE and coming down with a mysterious illness, she managed to give an interview that seemingly focused on two things: Tattoos and hair.

First, Miley — no stranger to tats — joked that she's decided to get inked once again ... and this time, she's really going for it.

"Didn't one girl get 'Drake' across her forehead? That's crazy. That's a dedicated fan right there," she deadpanned. "I was thinking about maybe getting 'Chris Brown' across this cheek. It'd be really good for my career."

Of course, given that the interview took place in Germany, Miley's joke quickly smashed into the language barrier, and a local TV station presented it as fact (even doing a side-by-side comparison with Mike Tyson, who famously sports a Maori-inspired facial tat). And while we'll never actually see her with Breezy's name inked on her cheek, Miley wasn't joking when it came to another topic ... her much-discussed hair.

Seems that ever since she went with her punky, chunky cut, Cyrus has seen the look pop up everywhere, and though she realizes imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, she's hoping her locks return ASAP.

"Hopefully my hair grows really quick, and the next time you see me I'll have a pony down to my butt. I just want to always be different," she said. "Everyone else has cut their hair to look just like me, so now I gotta do something different. I don't like when you walk in and you see a bunch of other you's. Elvis said it's the greatest form of flattery when people copy you, [and] I agree."

Of course, Miley hasn't just been discussing tattoos and hair ... she apparenly also found time to pose naked on a new Marc Jacobs' T-shirt, and on Friday, she tweeted the provocative image to her fans.

Cyrus is the latest artist to take part in Jacobs' "Protect The Skin You're In" campaign, which aims to raise awareness about skin cancer. Proceeds from the sale of the shirt will benefit melanoma research at the New York University Cancer Institute at NYU's Langone Medical Center.