Kanye West may have taken a short break from personal promotional duties on Saturday to welcome the birth of his daughter
 with Kim Kardashian, but that doesn't mean the Yeezus
 train totally came to a halt.

On the same weekend the happy couple celebrated their daughter's debut, Kanye finally screened the long-rumored short film starring not-really-brother-in-law Scott Disick on the side of a building in Los Angeles during a listening party.

The 'Ye mini-movie, inspired by the 2000 film adaptation of Bret Easton Ellis' shocking Wall Street serial killer novel, trades the film's signature murder soundtrack, Huey Lewis' "Hip to be Square," with West's "New Slaves," and swaps out Disick for Christian Bale in the role of nattily dressed killer Patrick Bateman.

It opens with a shot of Kim Kardashian bestie Jonathan Cheban reclining on his white couch sporting a custom suit with suspenders and slicked-back hair in place of the original's Jared Leto. (In a strange twist, both men are playing their respective movie roles while also addressing each other by their given name.)

Disick appears and snatches a copy of the art-less Yeezus CD from a stack and starts a soliloquy about the music similar to Bateman's insanely coked-up ramblings from the movie. "The early work was a little to hip-hop for me and my tastes," and amped-up Disick says while pacing around and dissecting 'Ye's career in a high-pitched voice. "But when Dark Twisted Fantasy came out in 2010 I think he really came into his own, but musically and lyrically." Read our First take on the year's most anticipated album.

After downing a few pills and donning his clear rain parka, Disick dance back in holding an ax and announces that West has been compared to "Jesus, Hitler, Walt Disney and even Steve Jobs."
 At one point, a numbed Cheban (playing himself) inquires about the raincoat as Disick cues up "Slaves" on his stereo, calling it an "undisputed masterpiece."

Kanye West's Yeezus leaks and frenzy ensues.

Disick then name-checks the Yeezus track "I Am a God," announcing that the "insecure" mainstream music press will never understand it, because, he shouts, "It's about me!" He then, of course, attacks Cheban with the ax and the blood flies in every direction before Disick has a seat and lights up a stogie as the album title flashes across the screen.

It's all part of the truly unconventional album roll-out for Yeezus that has included a pledge of no singles, as well as a listening party on a NYC loading dock
 and a previous global announcement featuring spontaneous projections
 on the side of buildings.