NEW YORK — If destiny means that we — from the executive to the cafeteria cook to the pop superstar — are all just speeding toward a predetermined course in our lives, then Beyoncé is truly destiny's child. In the opening scenes of her HBO documentary, "Life Is but a Dream," we meet the singer at about age 7 and, if you believe in that kind of thing, discover that even her relationship to her "insane, incredible" fans was fated.

On Tuesday night (February 12), MTV News made our way to the elegant Ziegfeld Theatre, where the Grammy winner was screening the doc four days ahead of its premiere on the premium cable channel. We chatted not only with talk-show deity Oprah Winfrey, but also the Queen herself, who was stunning in a beaded gown on the red carpet but also unnaturally serene as a storm of lights thundered around her. In gathering clips for the film, Bey told us that she'd discovered that things have a weird way of coming full circle. Basically, there are no accidents.

"I actually have a moment in the movie that's dedicated to the fans," she said of the home-movie scene in which her father, Mathew Knowles, is heard speaking in voiceover as a cowboy-boot-wearing Beyoncé, sister Solange and a family friend sit on the front porch of her childhood home in Houston. "It's so funny because, I don't want to give it away, but I was down with the Bey Hive since I was a little girl — I just didn't know it until I got into the edit and I said, 'Oh my God! It's so funny how everything in my life connects."

The 90-minute documentary, for which Bey gets executive producer and co-director credits (with longtime collaborator Ed Burke), pulls back the lens on Beyoncé. And if that seems impossible considering her every blink is documented daily by a sea of blogs, the doc only proves how much we don't ever get to see of the budding icon. From the hospital delivery room to a stirring birthday dinner for husband Jay-Z, these are the moments we won't see on her Instagram. They not only help balance our view of the megastar, but they're likely to soften even her critics.

"I hope they are proud, I hope they know they are a part of everything I do," she added of her Hive.

Winfrey, who's set to host the 4 singer on Saturday's episode of "Oprah's Next Chapter," recalled previewing "Life Is but a Dream" with nine graduates of her girls' school in South Africa and their astonished reactions.

"What I thought [of the documentary] was, 'This is so empowering, so great!' There's a moment where [Beyoncé] said she did this because she wanted to learn how to trust herself and how to be more honest and how to grow — well that's what everybody's trying to do. So when we finished, all my girls said, 'She's just like us!' And I went, sorta," she said with a laugh.

Will you watch "Beyoncé: Life Is but a Dream"? Tell us in the comments!