When Waka Flocka Flame first tried his hand at rap, he faced criticisms about his rambunctious rhyme style and rep in the street. Maybe that's why Flocka can relate to Chief Keef and all of his recent drama.

On Thursday (January 17), Keef was sentenced to 60 days in juvenile detention after a judge ruled that he violated his probation for handling a firearm in a filmed interview with the popular music site Pitchfork last June. Well, Flocka has a bit of advice for the teenage Keef.

"People like me, I could just show him the bigger picture like, 'You ain't gotta hold no gun in no interview. It's bigger than that, you're already there. Get your people out,' " Waka told MTV News today. "That goes to show people don't care about the situation they just gonna laugh at the lifestyle."

Keef's popularity cannot be denied. The music video for his breakout single "I Don't Like" racked up over 20 million views on YouTube since its release last March. Still, for as much love that Keef has received, he's faced just as much criticism for his dealings in the street and his raw, simplistic rap style. Keef's December album Finally Rich was touted as "one of the best major-label debuts in recent memory" by Spin.com, counted as the worst rap album of 2012 on RapRadar.com and every site in between has reported on his legal woes. Sosa has risen as hip-hop's most polarized figure.

"That Chief Keef situation; that just showed me how people can just disrespect you and accept you at the same time. That's a kid at the end of the day. I feel like that's me when I first started rapping, people judged me," Waka said. "It's just that they judge you because they don't understand you. Instead of judging the kid and just bashing him down, why not reach an arm out and help him."

50 Cent has also been singing Keef's praises. "Chief Keef, I think he has something, obviously. Even within the system, no one has done anything for Chief Keef," the G-Unit head told us on Wednesday. "He's still just this raw music, raw talent, because he shot all of these music videos in the living room."

Flocka says he recently spoke to Keef and plans to visit him, but in the meantime he wishes everyone would just lay off of the youngster. "If your kids listen to a specific style of music, you should reach an arm out to a kid, not just say 'Yo, he got 60 days for holdin' a gun,' " he proposed before reminding folks that Keef is just a production of his violent Chicago environment. "That Kid he's from a neighborhood where being 21 is like getting a diploma."

What do you think is next for Chief Keef's career? Let us know in the comments!