As we draw closer to the release of "Dredd 3D" and the positive reactions to the newest adaptation of the British comics roll in, it's becoming clear that Karl Urban and company have beat the odds and done something really special.

Prematurely written off by many online writers as a too-soon reboot of the 1994 Sylvester Stallone film, "Dredd 3D" is, in fact, a hard-R do-over, and Karl Urban couldn't be prouder.

"It's a great validation for everybody who put so much time and energy and effort in it," Urban told MTV News during the Toronto International Film Festival. "Here's the thing: it's a fun film. It's a really fun film, and audiences are having a great time watching it, so we're very happy."

For many fans, including Urban, the satisfaction from the new "Dredd" stems from its reverence for the source material, the prime example of that being Dredd's refusal to remove his helmet. "As I've said before, I'm a longtime fan of 'Dredd.' I read it growing up. To me, that's essential," Urban said about his helmet. "That's part of his enigma. That's part of who he is. To do something contradictory to the way the character was originally created... it was certainly a choice that was never considered by myself or anyone else on this production."

Urban has stood by his strongly worded opinions when it comes to "Dredd" for months now. When we spoke with him at San Diego Comic-Con in July, he made the distinction between "Dredd 3D" and "Judge Dredd" very clear.

"I saw [Stallone's] movie when it came out in '94. Tonally, these films couldn't be more different," Urban said. "I think it's a difference of if you like your heroes wearing lycra and gold cod pieces, then his film's the one for you. If you like a badass movie where your heroes are real and wearing leather motorbike suits and body armor and hard-core, gritty, pull-no punches, this is the movie for you."

Check out everything we've got on "Dredd 3D."