After weeks of buildup, not-so-subtle campaigns by major studios, prognosticating by critics and award season pundits, etc, the 2011 class of Oscar winners were announced on Sunday night in a predictably lengthy and star-studded telecast.

While the big stories of the night always revolve around who/what won (answer: "The King's Speech," Natalie Portman, Colin Firth, Christian Bale and Melissa Leo), when MTV News hit up the extra-exclusive hot-ticket post-Oscar Vanity Fair bash, we found there was an equal amount of buzz about the performances of first-time hosts Anne Hathaway and James Franco, as well as reactions to the overall show itself. And the reviews of which were decidedly mixed.

"It was great!" "Glee" star Jane Lynch exclaimed. "I loved the opening number and thought James and Anne played off each other well."

"Family Guy" creator Seth MacFarlane's review, which we asked him to deliver in character Stewie Griffin wasn't quite as rosy.

"Let's see, I was disappointed that Hugh Jackman didn't sing that song," MacFarlane said in Stewie's haughty faux-British accent, recalling the moment in the show when Hathaway sang a song blaming Jackman for bailing on a supposed duet. "That was dreadful that he backed out on that poor girl like that. What a wicked man.

"Was that was what was supposed to happen? Was that for real? " MacFarlane continued, speaking as himself. "There was a lot of really uncomfortable moments, like things were kind of half-formed, you know?"

Awkward-moment master Russell Brand, who presented the award for best foreign language film with his "Arthur" co-star Helen Mirren, didn't seem to notice anything uncomfortable.

"It was wonderful," he said of the show. "I'm happy that 'The King's Speech' did well."

When asked what he thought were the funniest moments, whether intentional or not, Brand pleaded the fifth.

"I don't know. I don't judge other people because I'm spiritual," he quipped.

On the other hand, Jimmy Kimmel, who readily admitted that he prefers his awards shows full of weird moments or unplanned disasters, had no problem passing judgment on the 83rd annual telecast.

"I think Kirk Douglas was funny," he said, speaking of the 94-year-old actor's charming, but slightly drawn-out, presentation of the Best Supporting Actress trophy. "I guarantee he planned to do that."

Kimmel's pick for unintentional funny moment went to Best Supporting Actress winner Melissa Leo dropping an F-bomb mid-acceptance speech before taking Douglas' cane from him to steady herself as they walked away from the podium.

What was your favorite moment of the night? How did Anne Hathaway and James Franco do as hosts? Tell us in the comments!

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