On Monday (November 15), Girl Talk brought the Internet to its knees with the out-of-nowhere release of All Day, his latest collection of whiplash-inducing, copyright-eschewing party jams. Clocking in at more than 70 minutes and featuring some 370 different samples, it's both GT's longest and most ambitious effort to date, which makes the fact that he gave it away for free all the more impressive.

To most people, at least.

"I don't know, it doesn't seem like all that big of a thing to me," the producer (real name: Gregg Gillis) told MTV News on Monday, hours after All Day hit the 'Net. "It's always like, 'How can I raise the bar a little bit?' So I thought just making it free, straight-up, would do that, and would get it out there quicker. That was really the only thinking behind it."

Still, Gillis will be the first to admit that he labored longer and harder on All Day than all of the previous Girl Talk albums combined, which is why it's understandable that he'd rather talk about some of his favorite individual moments on the album rather than the marketing strategy (or lack thereof) behind its release.

"I definitely really like the opening bit, the 'War Pigs' thing," he said. "I think the flow is just perfect and the energy is right, and like I said before ... you always want to make a strong impact out of the gates, and that was the perfect moment. I really like the Soulja Boy/ Aphex Twin mix. I really like the 'Where's Your Head At?'/ Rick Ross 'Blowin' Money Fast' mix. ... Oh, and the M.O.P. over Miley Cyrus' 'Party in the USA' mix is definitely one of the more magical moments to me."

All Day has only been out for 24 hours, but fans have already created an ever-growing list of all the samples Gillis mined to make the album. And they've been contacting him nonstop to discuss their favorite mixes, too. Though the response has been overwhelming, Gillis said he's pretty used to it at this point. After all, when it comes to his music, playing "Spot the Sample" is half of the fun.

"People are always juiced about the big ones ... the Jackson 5 samples and things like that, but when people are really excited, they kinda cite the slightly more obscure ones," Gillis laughed. "The Fugazi ['Waiting Room' sample] has been one people have been talking about a lot, and the Aphex Twin/Soulja Boy one. ... People kind of expect the huge pop hits and the classics, but it's the ones that are slightly less popular that really get the fans who have been listening to my stuff for years really excited about diving in."