From substance-abusing superstars to untimely bathroom breaks to sincere moments of Hollywood appreciation, there is nothing quite like the Golden Globes. Now, as the Hollywood Foreign Press Association prepares for its 67th annual ceremony on Sunday, it is time once again for the liquor to flow, the stars to mingle and the fans to be entertained.

Below is a list of our favorite Golden Globes moments of all time. Stay tuned to MTV News for our full coverage this weekend — and who knows? Maybe we'll be reporting on a new, unexpected moment that could only happen at the Globes.

Tracy Morgan Speaks Freely
When "30 Rock" won Best Comedy last year and Tracy Morgan got up to speak, the whole world knew that it was time to hear some crazy. Sure enough, the unpredictable funnyman did not disappoint. "I'm the face of post-racial America — deal with it, Cate Blanchett!" he declared. After referring to Barack Obama's recent presidential win and thanking the man who makes tacos on the show's set, he screamed, "I love you Europe!" We have no idea what Tracy was talking about, but the dude sure is funny.

Bathroom Buddies
In 1998, Christine Lahti's name was called as Best Actress in a TV Drama winner, but she was nowhere to be found. After someone ran into the ladies room and informed her that the entire world was trying to find her, she finally emerged — thankfully, without any toilet paper stuck to her shoe. Lightning struck twice in 2001, when Renée Zellweger thought she had enough time for a potty run and similarly missed her Best Actress in a Musical or Comedy announcement. Why doesn't this never happen to the actors? Do they have stronger bladders?

Stay Classy, Ving Rhames
In what might be the most touching Globes moment of all time, the 1998 ceremony featured a tough Best Actor in a Miniseries or TV Film race that included Jack Lemmon in "12 Angry Men" and Ving Rhames as the legendary fight promoter in "Don King: Only in America." When Rhames won, he shocked the crowd by taking the podium, crying and exclaiming: "Is Mr. Jack Lemmon here? Would you please come up here, sir?" As the surprised veteran actor took the stage to riotous applause, Rhames said, "I'd like to give this to you," and then backed away. Lemmon, who would die three years later, could only stammer: "That was one of the nicest, sweetest moments I've ever known in my life."

Elizabeth Taylor, The Female Tracy Morgan
We're not going to speculate that alcohol or other substances are the cause of any Globes insanity, but you can judge for yourself when moments occur like Elizabeth Taylor's 2001 presentation of the Best Motion Picture - Drama Award. After struggling mightily with the teleprompter and reading the nominees' names in a weird, high-pitched voice, she exclaimed: "And the winner is ... it's flashing 'envelope.' " As the audience shouted helpful pointers and Dick Clark came out to assist, the two-time Oscar winner slurred her speech and left us all a bit embarrassed on her behalf.

Isaiah Washington Drops the F-Bomb (Again)
In 2006, Isaiah Washington had finally broken through to mainstream success on "Grey's Anatomy," then came under fire when reports surfaced that he had threatened co-star Patrick Dempsey and called T.R. Knight a very bad three-letter slur for gay people. By the time the Globes rolled around a few months later, it appeared as though the controversy had blown over — until "Grey's" won. During the backstage speeches, in front of the world's assembled press, he dropped the F-bomb again. As someone who was in the room, let me tell you — things got uncomfortable really fast. Soon enough, Washington was off the show.

America, Meet Oliver Stone
Now, the world knows him as one of the best (and most controversial) filmmakers of the past quarter-century. But in 1979, a kid name Oliver Stone won a Best Screenplay Globe for "Midnight Express" and used it as an opportunity to launch a tirade against America's anti-drug policies. Host Chevy Chase advised him, "Just say 'thank you' and leave the stage," as the audience booed, but it wasn't until security guards approached that the future "JFK" filmmaker finally turned off and dropped out.

Lara Flynn Boyle's Not So Pretty In Pink
The Oscars will always have Björk's swan dress as its lowest red-carpet fashion, and the Globes can thank the loopy star from "The Practice" for similarly establishing its benchmark. Showing up at the 2003 ceremony in a ballerina outfit complete with tutu and lace-up heels, it was hard to tell whether Boyle legitimately thought it was appropriate attire, was simply begging for attention or had a top-secret musical number planned in her head.

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