This past weekend, she sold more than 1.3 million books in a single day. In December, her first "Twilight" movie is expected to have a similarly enormous impact on the box office.

If you're reading this article right now with bags under your eyes and a half-chugged Red Bull next to your computer, then you've likely spent the past few days of your life absorbed in the whirlwind media frenzy surrounding Stephenie Meyer.

On this "Twilight" Tuesday, we invite you to check out our coverage of the weekend's chaos, the meeting of notable Twilighters that took place hours before the release of "Breaking Dawn," and our full coverage of the "Twilight" mania explosion. We also invite you to submit your "Breaking Dawn" questions now that you've read the book, so we can bring them to Meyer herself when she visits the MTV News studios for one of her first post-publication interviews later this week.

But first, we present part two of Stephenie's interview with Kim Stolz, conducted mere hours before the "Dawn" release. In this candid conversation, the down-to-earth author 'fessed up about the key differences between Edward and Jacob, why she needs to watch "Buffy" and the dream car she hopes to be driving someday soon.

MTV: You've spoken about times when you had to stand up to your agents and publishers for integrity. Could you tell us about one?

Meyer: When I first started with "Twilight," I didn't have any experience. I didn't know what I was doing. So I was pretty intimidated by the editors and the publishers, and I felt like I was a kid in school with the principal telling me what to do! It was hard for me. There were things I changed in the story that I sometimes think maybe would have been better [if I hadn't], but I found what really unleashed the lioness waiting inside was when they tried to mess with who my characters were. When they said, "This is how we would like this to go," I was like, "Edward would never do that! That's impossible!" It always got back to that. If it was something [threatening] the characters, I could hold my own. And that taught me the confidence I needed to continue with a career in writing.

MTV: There's a rumor out there that someone wanted to kill Bella's mother, Renee. True?

Meyer: Well, she's not a huge character in the universe, right? But my sticking thing was that if she died, and [Bella] went to her father, it didn't say as much about Bella's character as her voluntarily going, to give her mother a gift. Then at the end, when she thought she had to rescue her mom, it wouldn't be the same [if she were rescuing] Charlie, because Charlie wasn't someone she had been taking care of her whole life.

MTV: I've read that Carlisle is loosely based on an interpretation of your father. True?

Meyer: I didn't think about him that way at first. It was later, after I had written [the books], that I realized how much they had in common. My dad really is an awesome guy. But my dad looks more like Bob Barker than a young Robert Redford. [She laughs.]

MTV: You're on tour with Justin Furstenfeld, who has said he would love to write a song for the "Twilight" movie. So will we hear Blue October come the film's release in December?

Meyer: In the movie? Oh gosh, I don't know. The only one I know for sure is that Muse is going to be on there — and that sort of makes my whole life!

MTV: Which bands would you choose, if you could, for the soundtrack?

Meyer: I love the Arcade Fire. I mean, I adore them. And Motion City Soundtrack is really awesome. I think [the filmmakers] are looking at a lot of up-and-coming people. The person in charge of the music has actually introduced me to a lot of awesome bands, like Stars and Castledoor. And I'm, like, "Wow, give me more music."

MTV: When you first conceived the "Twilight" series, did you have the entire thing in your head? Or has the audience response helped change it over the years?

Meyer: I have not been influenced by the audience at all, because I wrote almost everything before "Twilight" came out. So there was no audience. "Breaking Dawn," I did know. The first sequel thing I wrote was this "Forever Dawn" thing that will never get out, because it's horrid. [She laughs.] But it's a really good outline for "Breaking Dawn" — it's very similar. I knew what I was doing, which is good, because I think if I hadn't, there might have been a lot of pressure.

MTV: Were you hesitant to read other books or watch movies about vampires because you didn't want it to change your vision?

Meyer: I was never into vampires before. ... But after I got started on [the "Twilight" series] I thought, "You know, I'm going to check into this whole vampire thing." So I tried reading a couple books, and it freaked me out, because I thought, "Did I do this wrong? Is this a rule I didn't know about?" It's just easier for me not to touch that stuff until I'm done. I'm going to get "Buffy" and watch the whole thing back-to-back, because I love Joss Whedon — I can't believe I've never seen it.

MTV: Which character do you relate to more: Edward or Bella?

Meyer: I think they all have little pieces of me. It was pretty natural for me to write [the books] from the perspective of a human female, because I am one. But I'm doing it again [with "Midnight Sun"], and I think Edward's perspective actually suits me a bit more. He sees the world similarly to me. He sees very black-and-white. He has a lot of rules for himself. He has his life very much orchestrated. Bella's just like, "Whatever goes. As long as you're not bothering anyone else, just do what you want to do." So I relate more to his perspective of the world.

MTV: Even your "bad" characters seem to all have some humane goodness. Why do you find this so necessary?

Meyer: Maybe it's because I'm a little naive, but I do like to think that there aren't really very many truly bad people in the world. I think that everybody has their reasons for what they do, and if you really look through their eyes, you could probably understand them. So I don't write a lot of bad guys — it's always people that understand things differently. And I totally understand Victoria's perspective. She makes a ton of sense to me.

MTV: Choice is also a dominant theme in your work. Why is that?

Meyer: You know, I don't ever think about that stuff beforehand. It comes out naturally. It's important for me to be free and know I'm acting for myself. I do things because I want to, and that's important. You want to be your own person.

MTV: What would you define as Edward's and Jacob's human faults?

Meyer: Edward's is that he definitely overreacts. Because he's so black-and-white, he goes to extremes completely and totally, and he's learning in "Eclipse" to balance that. Jacob doesn't ever think about anything. See, Edward thinks way too much, and Jacob just charges ahead without thinking about what he's doing. Sometimes he comes off as really rude or obnoxious. He has his obnoxious moments, but he's very human in that. He's very much a 16-year-old boy.

MTV: Vehicles are also very important in the "Twilight" books. So what's Stephenie Meyer's dream ride?

Meyer: I'm waiting for the right Porsche 9. [She laughs.] That's really my car — I love Porsches. I'm kind of a silver-car person, but I think with the Porsche, you would have to go red.

MTV: Is it going to be hard to walk away from "Twilight"?

Meyer: I don't feel like I have yet. I'm still working with the Edward book, which keeps me in it. I know for absolute sure that this is the last time Bella's going to tell the story, but I don't know if I'll be able to leave all the characters behind. There are so many stories there. While I plan to do some other things first, I may come back to it.

Every Tuesday is "Twilight" Tuesday here at MTV News! Check back here each and every week for the hottest scoop on the film adaptation of Stephenie Meyer's beloved vampire series, and we'll still bring you breaking "Twilight" news throughout the rest of the week. And make sure you check out the MTV Movies Blog for our ongoing "Twilight" discussions each and every day.

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