Following a busy hiatus from the limelight, Jesse McCartney is letting his swarms of swooning fans know just where they can find him: Right Where You Want Me.

Slated to hit stores September 19, the aptly titled sophomore release is the successor to McCartney's 2004 platinum debut album, Beautiful Soul. There can be a lot of pressure following up a record that sold more than 1.5 million copies, but McCartney has remained optimistic.

"I couldn't be happier," McCartney told MTV News at the Nickelodeon Kids Choice Awards in April, where he took home the coveted Favorite Male Singer award (see "Will Smith Issues A Warning, Timberlake Thanks His Butt At Kids' Choice Awards"). "It's going extremely well. I'm working with some cool producers — John Shanks [Kelly Clarkson, Ashlee Simpson] and Marti Frederiksen [Bo Bice, Pink] — and it's gonna be a fun pop-rock record."

After co-writing four of the songs on Soul, McCartney has taken a commanding role this time around as co-writer on all the new tunes. Describing the upcoming record as a more mature effort, the 19-year-old said the lyrics would address his personal experiences over the past few years.

Included in McCartney's forthcoming LP is the title track — which was released earlier this week as the album's first single, rather than the previously reported single, "Blow Your Minds" (see "Jesse McCartney Hopes To 'Blow Your Minds' With Next Single"). The song sprung from McCartney's collaboration with his guitar player, Dory Lobel, and the songwriting team of Adam Watts and Andy Dodd who helped him pen "Beautiful Soul."

"I'm really happy with the song," McCartney said in a statement. "It takes me in a new direction musically but still has a familiar element of 'Beautiful Soul.' "

A video by Big TV — known for his work with Maroon 5 and Lauryn Hill — is scheduled to air soon. In the meantime, some lucky fans will get a sneak preview of McCartney's new songs at festivals throughout the summer; the rest have a headlining tour to look forward to this fall.

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