It remains to be seen if the G8 leaders gathered in Scotland heard the message of Saturday's Live 8 concerts, but one thing's for sure: Organizer Bob Geldof is getting serious props.

The disheveled rocker has been nominated for the 2006 Nobel Peace Prize for his work on behalf of debt relief and financial aid to Africa. Norwegian parliamentarian Jan Simonsen made the nomination on Wednesday (July 6), according to a BBC News report, singling out Geldof's tireless efforts to help the world's poorest nations.

"Bob Geldof took the initiative in July 2005 to arrange a string of rock concerts to focus on the problems of poor nations, and pressure the world's leading politicians to take actions in fighting poverty," Simonsen said in a statement. Geldof will have to wait a year to find out if he will take his place alongside such past winners as Martin Luther King Jr., Nelson Mandela, Mother Teresa and former presidents Theodore Roosevelt and Jimmy Carter, because the February 1 nomination deadline for the 2005 award has already passed.

Geldof, 53, was nominated for a Nobel Prize in 1986 for his pivotal work on Live Aid, which raised more than $100 million for African famine relief. He received many awards for this work, including an honorary knighthood from Queen Elizabeth II (as a non-British subject, the Irish-born Geldof was legally precluded from being awarded a full knighthood and use of the title "Sir").

Over the past 20 years, Geldof has established a reputation for his impassioned, often profane pleas for humanitarian and financial aid to developing nations. He has asked the G8 leaders, who are meeting in Scotland this week, to double aid to the poorest African nations and cancel more than $40 billion in debt (see "Geldof Speaks Out As G8 Protesters Clash With Police").

The peace prize is awarded annually by the Norwegian Nobel Committee based on recommendations from, among others, member of parliaments from around the world. The winners are announced in October.

Get involved: Learn about the poverty crisis in Africa, the proposed solutions, and how you can help. Plus find all of our coverage of the international Live 8 concerts and more at our thinkMTV Live 8 hub.