50 Cent says now that his album has been pushed back to March 8, it doesn't make much sense to still call it The St. Valentine's Day Massacre, so he's cutting it down to just The Massacre now.

"I was trying to force Interscope Records to release my record on February 15," 50 explained, "but Interscope Records is reactive. I'm proactive, so I threw 'Disco Inferno' out and kinda got them to respond to me. But [The Massacre] probably wouldn't even be coming out March 8 if I didn't do that at that point, because this project is a big project to them, they want to have everything mapped out and it's more mechanical this time."

50 leaked "Disco Inferno" himself around Thanksgiving to start building a buzz for his album (see "Mixtape Monday: 50 Cent Firing Back On New LP; Em, Tupac And Jada Team Up").

"Aww, man, the record's done incredible," 50 marveled. "It's #4 in the country right now [on Billboard's Hot Rap Tracks chart], and it had zero support from Interscope Records. I went out with it with or without them and they caught up to it. They ended up sending [out official promos] after I MP3ed it across the country. I feel good about it, and now I'm ready to move into 'The Candy Shop.' "

50 recently shot videos for both his new songs. "Candy Shop," which features female G-Unit member Olivia (see "50 Cent's Sticky New Single, 'Candy Shop,' Hits The Streets"), will begin airing Monday as part of MTV's "Making the Video," but "Disco Inferno" will be a little harder to scope out on-air. See, on the song 50 commands, "Shake, sh-sh-shake that ass, girl," and he shows women carrying out his orders in the video.

"It's a little ... it's edgy," he said with a smile. For "Candy Shop," he was a little less overt but still surrounded himself with women nonetheless.

"I think the song itself is great," he said of "Candy." "I attempted to be as sexual as possible, from a male perspective, without being vulgar or obscene. I think that I did a great job on it. The video itself, visually, me and [director] Jessy Terrero came up with the treatment for. It's exciting. Trick Daddy had a song ['Sugar'] that he put out where he had candy references in the video, so I didn't go that route, and we tried to do something a little different."

50 went through a different process to get beats for The Massacre. Dr. Dre and Eminem are present, like they were on Get Rich or Die Tryin', but he also worked with some guys who are so new he doesn't even remember their names.

"I don't have an A&R department when it comes to my project," he explained. "I get so personal with it that I've got to kind of pick everything myself. So I have them take the music that's sent to us and have them put it onto a blank CD and just put a number on the CD instead of just sending me the name of the actual producer. Sometimes you lean toward music that is produced by a great producer, someone that you have respect for, and you may pick something that ain't actually the hottest thing."

50 has recorded more than 60 songs for The Massacre and is in the process of cutting down his track listing. There's at least one record he knows is definitely staying.

"There's a song called the 'Baltimore Love Thing' that I think is really interesting, " he said. "It's about the relationship between an addict and a drug, heroin. And there's points in the song where the drug becomes angry with the woman for trying to leave.

"The Massacre, I think it's better than Get Rich or Die Tryin', honestly," he continued. "I spent a lot of time, put a lot of details into it. I actually took longer recording this record than I did Get Rich or Die Tryin'."

The "Making the Video" episode on "Candy Shop" debuts Monday at 6 p.m. on MTV.