Believe it or not, a fanny pack is no longer just a device worn around the waist of dorky suburban tourists to hold their extra rolls of film and sunscreen.

Three girls from Brooklyn have given the words hipster cachet among folks who wouldn't be caught dead in any accessory with Velco, let alone a fluorescent hue.

To those people, FannyPack are the coolest dance music group to emerge from New York's largest borough since Lisa Lisa & Cult Jam shone from the streets of East Flatbush in the mid-1980s. The group, composed of singers Jessibel (18), Belinda (16) and Cat (21), and beat makers Matt Goias and Fancy, has an overnight sensation on its hands with the retro club banger "Cameltoe," partly due to the song's giggle-provoking topic, and partly because of its infectious, body-moving beat.

Star and Buc Wild of New York hip-hop radio station Hot 97 have been spinning the tune daily on their morning show, and it recently appeared on crosstown pop station WKTU-FM's "Top Eight at Eight" countdown. In San Francisco, KYLD-FM listeners requested "Cameltoe" even more than singles by 50 Cent and Lil' Kim.

And thanks to radio's pervasiveness as in-store play, a whole new demographic is receptive to "Cameltoe." Cat once received a phone call from a friend who heard it in, of all places, a bagel store. Odder still, a middle-aged man was shaking his moneymaker to it while waiting for his bialy and schmear.

"Everything is moving so fast," Jessibel said of the media's reaction to the groundswell. "Photo shoots and interviews — we've had three in one week and then three the next. It's crazy."

That a song full of bounce and cheeky humor becomes a mainstream hit isn't as odd as when it happens to a tune with such a vulgar yet funny theme.

For those who don't know, a "camel toe" is an outward symptom of a condition some, the group Korn being among them, have termed cameltosis. Only half the population is susceptible to the affliction, which is similar to the universally contracted wedgie ... only different. More of an upfront problem, you could say. And that's about as close to a description as MTV's standards department will allow.

"I was watching 'That '70s Show' one night, and I was like, 'Yo, that girl's got a camel toe,' " Cat said, gently approaching the subject. "So if it's on TV, I think it was something that needed to be addressed."

A half animated, half live-action video for "Cameltoe" was shot earlier this month at Silver Cup Studios in Queens.

FannyPack started as the brainchild of Goias and Fancy, two New York DJs with a passion to spin the music they love but who felt shackled by mainstream taste. "When you DJ, no matter how good or fun you are, people are always going to come up to you and say, 'Play the new Ja Rule' or whatever," Fancy moaned.

After hearing "holla" and "go shorty" one too many times, the pair thought about trying to tread the middle ground. "We always noticed that there is a weird gap between the older stuff that really rocks the crowd — like Prince, Chubb Rock and Big Daddy Kane and [other] more up-tempo and fun booty stuff — and the 80 beats per minute, slower new hip-hop stuff," Goias said. "Both types of music are great, but we tried to figure out a way to put those two things together."

To sing their booty-bounce tunes, they enlisted Cat, whom Goias knew from the DJ circuit. The former indie-rocker could hit all the notes, but something was missing. Their music needed something that sounded "more Brooklyn."

The heavily accented Jessibel entered the fray after Goias overheard her flexing her pipes. "I heard her voice walking down the street and it was just perfect for what we were trying to do," he said. "I overheard her screaming to somebody across the street and was like, 'That's the girl.' "

Jessibel's schoolmate Belinda rounded out the lineup and FannyPack, whose name was chosen just because it's dumb ("Our second choice was Jogging," Fancy said) was born.

In July, a full-length album, So Stylistic, featuring "Cameltoe" is set to drop. The album recalls an era when music was fun and lyrics were more than an itemization of a rapper's net worth.

"People want to listen to music to have fun and dance and have a good time," Jessibel said. "Most music I hear is 'I have a Benz this, I'm wearing this, jersey this.' [Not everyone] wants to hear music or rapping about what you got. We want to have fun. We want to make sure you can get to that club and shake your butt."