Nashville Pussy Get Down And Dirty On Debut Reissue

Heavy-metalers are raising hell and laughing all the way through the re-release of their first album, Let Them Eat Pussy.

LOS ANGELES -- When Blaine Cartwright says most people get the joke behind his heavy-rock band, Nashville Pussy, he could be referring to a

number of things.

There's the cover of their debut album, Let Them Eat Pussy, which

has just been re-released on Mercury Records. It depicts the two female

Pussys, guitarist Ruyter Suys and bassist Corey Parks, in a pose designed

to look like they're receiving oral sex from two bald guys.

Of course, singer Cartwright also could be referring to the way that Suys and Parks tend to make out while performing ... or Parks' propensity for breathing fire onstage ... or the band's name, which Ticketmaster has refused to print on tickets and the band's own chauffeur has refused to say out loud.

But no. Cartwright is talking about himself.

"The joke, to me, is that some pudgy, balding 34-year-old guy like myself can actually think of an idea good enough to become a rock star this late in life," he says.

After some thought, Cartwright adds, "That's so f---ing funny to me. That's my personal joke on the world. But the band's joke -- we're just trying to have fun. If someone's taking it too seriously, they're taking it wrong. We take rock 'n' roll seriously, we don't take ourselves seriously."

It's well into a Wednesday afternoon at Mercury Records, but you wouldn't know it by looking at Nashville Pussy. Cartwright is gruff and puffy-eyed and looks like he's just rolled out of bed. The 29-year-old Suys, who's wearing a leopard-skin miniskirt and a tan, Western-style top, is putting on a new face with the help of contents from a pink makeup bag.

Cartwright does most of the talking, though Suys often completes his sentences. As he talks, she looks up from her compact mirror with evident adoration. The husband-and-wife guitar team is an unlikely match on the surface. Yet the pair's chemistry is apparent.

"She's like Angus and I'm like Malcolm," Cartwright says, referring to lead guitarist Angus Young and rhythm guitarist Malcolm Young of heavy-metal legends AC/DC.

"We just want to rock until we conquer the world," Suys offers. "For as long as we can."

"Yeah, for as long as we can," Cartwright adds.

The next step in Nashville Pussy's rise to world domination is the re-release of Let Them Eat Pussy. Recorded over five days and produced by Kurt Bloch of underground punk heroes the Fastbacks, the record is a furious sonic assault that puts out thundering rhythms and ferocious metal licks which enter abruptly and never stop pounding.

Cartwright growls and screeches his way through adamant hard-rock numbers with titles such as "I'm the Man" and "You're Goin' Down." On the album's heaviest song, "Fried Chicken and Coffee," the Pussys turn their group name into an anthemic chant.

"I just try to make these guys laugh," Cartwright says of his lyrics. "They all come from something weird someone told me."

"We've got a new song about getting a blow job from a rattlesnake, which comes from Corey [Parks'] fiancé's garbage man," Suys adds.

After being jilted by another label, Nashville Pussy teamed up with Mercury. But the label was forced to find a new factory to press the album when its normal pressing plant refused to do the job because of the album's cover.

Not that the Pussys seem to be concerned about that or any other fuss. While Cartwright and Suys are talking, drummer Jeremy Thompson decides to use a nearby table as a cot and stretches out.

Parks, the band's 6-foot-3-inch blonde bassist, is nowhere in sight. Finally, five minutes before the interview is over, she storms through the conference-room door apologizing profusely, blaming the L.A. traffic. Despite her imposing physique (her brother is a professional basketball player in the NBA) and penchant for breathing fire in concert, the 28-year-old Parks has a friendly presence.

"The only people that complain about what we do are people who haven't seen

the show," says Parks, who is duded up with a cowboy hat and an "Eat Me"

tattoo scrawled just above her underwear line.

"Once people see me and Ruyter [Suys] onstage and you see that we're strong and confident and that we know how to play our instruments, people are like, 'God, you guys are great!' " Parks says. "We represent women in a really positive way."

Now based in Atlanta, Nashville Pussy began about two and a half years ago

when Suys and Cartwright decided to take their jam sessions out of their kitchen and put together a band. The two hooked up with Parks and enlisted

various drummers before finally settling on Thompson last summer.

"We pretty much took what we were doing in our kitchen and brought it onstage," says Cartwright, who previously played guitar in Nine Pound Hammer. "We weren't really sure what we wanted to do, really. We just knew

we wanted it as hard and fast as possible."

Later that night, Nashville Pussy were hard and fast -- on the stage

of the Hollywood haunt the Opium Den. Despite their propensity to be

self-indulgent at times, the Pussys were, nonetheless, a riveting live act. Suys tossed her curly, golden locks as she spastically slammed out blazing riffs. Thompson beat his drums as if he hated them. And all the while, Parks towered to the left, making nasty-girl faces as she fingered her bass.

And then there was Cartwright, commanding the center stage, his balding head shining in the spotlight.