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Bop Shop: Songs From Haim, Yung Gravy, Jessie Ware, And More

This week, a Billie Eilish cover, a Tony Soprano-inspired tune, and more

The search for the ever-elusive "bop" is difficult. Playlists and streaming-service recommendations can only do so much. They often leave a lingering question: Are these songs really good, or are they just new?

Enter Bop Shop, a hand-picked selection of songs from the MTV News team. This weekly collection doesn't discriminate by genre and can include anything — it's a snapshot of what's on our minds and what sounds good. We'll keep it fresh with the latest music, but expect a few oldies (but goodies) every once in a while, too. Get ready: The Bop Shop is now open for business.

  • Georgia: “Everything I Wanted” (Billie Eilish cover)

    No one can do what Billie Eilish can, so Georgia doesn’t try. Instead, the London dance-pop star highlights the bright spots on this gauzy, dark dream of Eilish’s tune, adding strings recorded at Abbey Road and a clarity of voice that makes each word a statement. The light shines through: This cover even comes paired with an orchestral take on last year’s excellent “About Work the Dancefloor.” —Patrick Hosken

  • Haim: “The Steps”

    With “Summer Girl,” “Now I’m in It,” and “Hallelujah,” it quickly became clear that Haim were on a winning streak. Earlier this month, that streak continued when the sisters dropped their empowering and therapeutic new single “The Steps,” which sets an unraveling relationship to groovy guitars and rip-roaring drums.

    “I can't understand why you don't understand me, baby,” the sisters croon on the chorus. But make no mistake; they can take care of themselves. “Every day I wake up and I make money for myself / And though we share a bed, you know that I don't need your help.” The relationship seems damaged beyond repair, but you won’t catch them sulking about it. “If you go left / And I go right / Hey, maybe that's just life sometimes.” If you need a lesson in shrugging it off, you’ve come to the right place. —Jordyn Tilchen

  • Yung Gravy & bbno$: "Myrtle Beach Summer 1974"

    I can't help but dance in my seat (or wherever I am) when I hear this infectious Baby Gravy 2 track. It may not be as suave as the other tracks on the excellent EP, but that's exactly why I love it. Evocative of the '70s club and clubgoers the song means to evoke, it's effortlessly funky and hilarious at the same time. Yung Gravy and bbno$ glide through the beat and trade-off bars for an earworm of a chorus that you won't be able to help bobbing your head to. It's probably not the best idea to roll up in the club with coronavirus right now, but this song is definitely the next best thing. —Brittany Vincent

  • Dash Flash: “Living My life”

    “I remember being broke, I remember hungry nights.” I love a good come-up bar. Dash Flash’s 2019 release “Living My Life” is full of these inspirational tidbits that let you know your life can change with some elbow grease. He peddles a straightforward flow while injecting it with personality, making his observations and memories pop underneath huge beats. “Living My Life” is Flash’s chance to let you know that behind the wet jewels and expensive neon-colored whips, there’s a serious struggle that brought him to this point. As he relays it to you, the way that it’s packaged gets you on the fast track to your own success. —Trey Alston

  • Vundabar: “Out of It”

    There’s no reason to bring in the news (and how terrible it all is) into this. So let’s focus on Boston indie outfit Vundabar and how much their sunny song feels like a reprieve from, well, everything. Even as the other tracks on their new album Either Light bound from caffeinated to garage-y, they explore the darker entropy of modern existence; band leader Brandon Hagen was influenced by The Sopranos when they made it. “I like Tony Soprano because his story makes the sometimes implicit brutality of American life and capitalism explicit,” he wrote recently. And here we are, talking about the news again. Good thing the springy Either Light is out in full right now. —Patrick Hosken

  • Jessie Ware: “Spotlight”

    The intro of Jessie Ware’s latest single might trick you into thinking you’re about to hear a cinematic ballad, perhaps something from the now-delayed new James Bond movie. But about 35 seconds in, the beat drops, and “Spotlight” changes gear into a ‘90s R&B-inspired disco track that fans of Toni Braxton will no doubt want to spin on repeat. Ware’s fourth album, What’s Your Pleasure?, is out June 5. —Bob Marshall

  • Asia Graves: “All I Need”

    With one line, wrapped in different voices from all sides, Asia Graves whisks you away to her world of honest emotions and true love. “All I Need” is an immersion in love’s honeymoon phase when it all feels right, no matter what happens. Her warm voice is submerged in a deep sea of aquatic production that sounds perfect in the way that it offsets her deeper timbre. If new love is like this, sign me up again. —Trey Alston

  • Sasami: “Mess”

    “What are you using for that fuzz sound?” an astute YouTube listener asks in the comments for this low-key banger. Sasami might rather keep it a trade secret, as it’s one of two potent elements on her roaring new “Mess.” The other one is her voice, doubled so closely that it becomes a powerful singular entity. “Mess” is, in fact, quite meticulously crafted. That’s what makes it so satisfying to hear those guitar squalls set the whole song on fire. —Patrick Hosken