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Taylor Swift Is Tired Of Slut-Shaming: 'It Sends Me Into A Real Sad Place'

'It was hard because I didn't understand why nobody was saying that this was wrong'

Yesterday (October 30), Beats 1 Radio released more from Zane Lowe's recent interview with Taylor Swift. In it, the singer spoke about the complicated relationship she had with her past records while making Lover, her upcoming role in Cats, and her friendship with Selena Gomez. Most importantly, though, Swift called out the music industry for slut-shaming and minimizing female artists — something she experienced firsthand at the age of 23.

In her early twenties, Swift's dating life was often the topic of conversation when her name was brought up in the media. Despite making and releasing quality music at the time, Swift was constantly being criticized for being a "serial dater" and for writing songs about her exes. "When I was 23 ... people were just kind of reducing me to, like, kind of making slideshows of my dating life and putting people in there that I'd sat next to at a party once," she said, noting that critics decided that her ability to pen lyrics was "like a trick rather than a skill and a craft."

Criticizing a female musician over her dating history or her lyrics about past relationships isn't just unfair — it's proof of the misogyny that continues to exist today. "It's a way to take a woman who's doing her job and succeeding at doing her job and making things, and — in a way — it's figuring out how to completely minimize that skill by taking something that everyone in their darkest, darkest moments loves to do, which is just to slut-shame," Swift said. And having been through it herself, it deeply saddens her to see that it's still an ongoing problem. "I can see a headline about a young artist, about a young female artist, about another breakup, and it sends me into a real sad place because I don't want that to keep happening."

Now, with songs like "The Man" and her increased interest in making sure creators are being compensated for her work, Swift isn't afraid to call out a problem when she sees one. "I don't think people understand how easy it is to infer that someone who's a female artist or a female in our industry is somehow doing something wrong by wanting love, wanting money, wanting success," she said. "Women are not allowed to want those things the way that men are allowed to want them, and so I think when I was the youngest, it was hard because I didn't understand why nobody was saying that this was wrong."

Having experienced this misogyny herself, Swift continues to encourage young, emerging talent to continue creating music, no matter what: "I'm like, 'Do not let anything stop you from making art. Just make things. Do not get so caught up in this that it stops you from making art, [even] if you need to make art about this. But never stop making things."