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Daniel Radcliffe Is ‘Happy Enough’ To Let Another Actor Play Harry Potter

Radcliffe doesn’t want ‘Harry Potter’ to become the new ‘Phantom Menace’

Can we let The Boy Who Lived just live? When 10-year-old Daniel Radcliffe made a blood oath to Warner Bros. back in 2000, he probably didn’t expect to still be fielding questions about Harry Potter at 27 (and most likely forever), and yet, here we are.

In an effort to capitalize on the Harry Potter hype train, it’s been reported that the studio is looking into adapting J.K. Rowling’s eighth story in the universe, stage play Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, for the big screen — and Warner Bros. allegedly wants Radcliffe to reprise his role as the Boy Wizard. (In a decade’s time, of course.)

However, Radcliffe told The Hollywood Reporter he’s “happy enough and secure enough” to let another English actor step into Harry Potter’s wizarding robes.

“Even in 10 years’ time I would still feel strange about going back to it,” he said. “There’s a part of me that's like, some things are better left untouched. If we went back to Potter, there’s a chance we’d make what Star Wars: The Force Awakens was to the original Star Wars, but there’s also the chance that we’d make Phantom Menace.

“So I don’t want to go back to anything like that and maybe sour what people have already loved,” he added.

Well, he certainly has a point.

When the special rehearsal script of The Cursed Child hit shelves in July, it did what every Harry Potter story before it did: broke records. It even broke records at the box office in London, where the West End play is currently sold out until 2018. However, fan response has been mixed. While some fans appreciate Rowling’s recent attempts to expand the wizarding world — with new short stories, new characters, continuations, and the forthcoming Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them big-screen trilogy starring Eddie Redmayne — others feel like the author is tinkering with something that ended so perfectly. (Though, to be fair, those lucky enough to have seen it live agree that it’s a spellbinding production.)

Yet it’s important to note that, much like Rowling herself, Radcliffe isn’t saying no to more Potter indefinitely: “I’m not going to close that door; that would be a stupid thing to do.”

You never know when you’re going to need a few Galleons.