Five Reasons to Love Rebecca Hall

Awareness of Rebecca Hall is at a low level. Too low! Starting now, we aim to rectify the situation. Behold, five reasons to appreciate the uber-talented Rebecca Hall!

She's an excellent actress.

Rebecca Hall first rose to American prominence with her supporting role as Sarah in The Prestige, but it was her role in Vicky Cristina Barcelona that really made everyone sit up and take notice. As the reserved Vicky, who finds herself caught between what she wants and what she should want, Hall completely entranced and was entirely convincing as a slightly awkward American in a foreign world. Hall's American accent is good, as is her demure way of handling the advances of Javier Bardem and the dual competition of Penelope Cruz and Scarlett Johansson. In The Town, her fear as the hostage of a stick-up gang is as palpable and heartbreaking as her previous work is soft and fragile. Not to say she's a one-note actress; she has that rare ability of conveying depth through little more than a glance.


She's lovely.

Though this isn't really a reason to love someone, people have been using it as a reason for thousands of years. Hall is unique, perhaps the sort of woman you'd see on the street and do a double take. Long dark hair frames her freckled oval face, with thick full lips that when opened seem to house more teeth than necessary, and she often smiles nervously in her roles, seemingly shy about her looks and the power they convey. Her brown eyes are often quiet, and there's a mixture of Eva Green and Liv Tyler in her looks. If she wasn't acting, it's entirely possible that she could be modeling for Burberry, or simply be one of your super-hot friends that all the guys want to talk to when you go out for drinks. But Rebecca Hall would laugh and tell them that it was a girl's night. She's just classy like that.


She's not overexposing herself.

While we'd love to see more of her, Hall is keeping her work steady instead of over-saturating the market and making people hate her. The worst is when a young actress begins to get famous and suddenly she's in everything whether the part is right for her or not. With a background in theater, Hall seems to understand the importance of selecting the proper role, and she still works in an excellent mixture of both stage and film roles. The Town may be one of her larger American roles; as they're promoting it quite heavily there's a good chance that she'll become more well-known and we'll have the pleasure of seeing a lot more of her in the coming years.


She seems smart.

Rebecca Hall is pretty good at keeping her name out of the tabloids, except when her recent friendship with Sam Mendes was blamed for the marriage problems between him and Kate Winslet. This simple adherance to privacy already makes her a favorite of mine, though as her popularity grows in America she will no doubt become more prominently featured. As for upbringing, she's the daughter of a well-known director and an opera singer. She went to a prestigious girl's school in England and then read English Literature for two years at a school in Cambridge before dropping out because she felt she had nothing to prove. There's something defiant and charming about that, just enough schooling without the actual degree itself. Having a real sense of yourself is grounding, and in interviews Hall projects confidence and openness.


She's still learning.

One of the best things about Rebecca Hall is her age; she's only 28 and has come into her own in recent years. This means no child actor growing pains, no starlet hysterics, and no drug-fueled meteoric rise and fall. There's plenty of time for her to grow as an actress and a person, bringing experience and life into her roles. If she plays it correctly, she can settle into a long career with a wide range of roles to her name.