Top Five Directing Duos

I'm not exactly stoked about it but my little cousin is probably going to force me to see Nim's Island this coming weekend and there is very little I can do about it. Believe me, you'd be powerless to those pouty, glassy little eyes as well. He doesn't really ask much of me. Maybe a Wii game here or there, but other than that he pretty much stays out of my business. Because he's seven. But he wants to see Nim's Island and he asked me directly in front of my aunt and if I blew him off I'm a miserable human being. So a Coke and a smile and a "Sure thing pal!" later, I'm committed, in like Flint.

The good news is I heard the movie isn't terrible. It's directed by Jennifer Flackett and Mark Levin, a wife-and-hubby team in the vein of Little Miss Sunshine's spousal double-threat, Jonathan Dayton and Valerie Faris. Traditionally, I think co-directing works. Hey, one of my favorite comedies, Quick Change, was directed by both Howard Franklin and big man Bill Murray. So this share and share alike business is okay in my book.

But who are the best directing partnerships? Glad I asked. Here they be:




The Wachowski Brothers
The Wachowski Brothers

Whatever your feelings may be on the Matrix series, the first film is undeniably great. They've been in hiding for a few years now although their presence was felt all over the fantastic V for Vendetta. And lest we forget, their debut, Bound was a terrific Hitchcockian tale (only with lesbians). Some have lost faith in this dynamic duo but I have not and I suspect Speed Racer will win back more than a few wandering sheep, no matter how insane the movie looks at this point.


Robert Rodriguez and Frank Miller
Robert Rodriguez and Frank Miller

Okay, they've only made one movie together (Sin City) but it was a heck of a movie. With Miller working closely with the actors and Rodriguez working closely with the visuals, they are a force to be reckoned with. Sin City 2 can't get here quick enough. Now if only their next film can have some real emotional depth. Hmm.


The Hughes Brothers
Allen and Albert Hughes

They're on a bit of a sabbatical as far as directing together right now but together they are one of the brightest talents in the biz. Menace II Society made waves, but Dead Presidents is their unheralded masterwork. They've dabbled in documentaries as well with the very funny and very disturbing, American Pimp. From Hell is their most flawed film but it's a first-rate production nonetheless. Allen Hughes is busy directing a segment of New York, I Love You but after that, I have them on notice. Get behind the camera, you two.


The Coen Brothers
The Coen Brothers

No Country for Old Men is the first film Joel and Ethan Coen have been credited with directing together, but from everything we've always heard they always wrote, produced and directed everything they did together. Pound for pound they are easily the best and most exciting filmmakers on this list with enough classic movies to make anyone jealous. See, it pays to be a geek. Though I'm pretty sure the Hughes brothers could kick their ass.


The Farrelly Brothers
The Farrelly Brothers

More brothers, I know. But what can I say? We need more sister combos. Maybe someone should set up a fund or something.

Anyway, these cats have been struggling at the plate these days and maybe their best years are behind them, but I'm still pulling for them to knock one out of the park again (yes, I've been watching tons of baseball lately). They will always be on my good side for Dumb and Dumber, Kingpin and There's Something About Mary. Their sweet, sentimental nature seeped through Shallow Hal and Stuck on You and their ability to go for the jugular gave a little weight to (particularly in the end) The Heartbreak Kid, but none of these efforts really panned out. Meanwhile, Fever Pitch just stunk. But for a while, it was like Camelot.