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Hopsin Addresses Label Split And Disses Funk Volume Co-Founder On 'Ill Mind Of Hopsin 8'

The fiery video is the latest in the 'Ill Mind' series

It's time to completely drop any lingering ideas that Hopsin's latest bold move will end up like that time he quit rap to move to Australia -- that is, a joke. Instead, his announcement earlier this year that he left Funk Volume, the label he co-founded and helped bring to indie rap prominence, appears to be very real.

In his January Facebook post on the incident, he blamed "the monster Damien Ritter," with whom he co-founded the label, for the fissure. "Having a crew like FV has been my vision since I was 14 years old and this man just destroyed it," he wrote. "Jarren [Benton], Dizzy [Wright], Swizzz, Dj Hoppa and I are all still on good terms. They will forever be my brothers and I support them in whatever they do."

He added: "I will let u guys know the full story soon."

He's started to do that now, with the release of "Ill Mind of Hopsin 8," where he stages a courtroom setting to air his grievances with Ritter, viscously lyrically attack him and explain what lead to his departure.

"It feels great," Hop told HipHopDX of putting out the video, adding that he's now signed to his own Undercover Prodigy label. "Been waiting to get it off my chest for two months now. I didn’t want to resort to that, but the way things are going with the whole Funk Volume situation, it’s kinda rubbing me the wrong way, so I had to be vocal about it. That’s since I was a child, that’s been my way of venting so I just had to do what I do best and be vocal.

"It was boiling for about I guess like a month and a half, two months prior to the actual breakup."

As you can probably tell from the title of the tracks, the California native has been releasing his "Ill Mind of Hopsin" videos as a series for a few years now. It's worth checking them all out -- more than his albums, they show Hop in his most natural and comfortable setting, relying on an uninterrupted narrative verse -- but you can start below, with his most popular, "Ill Mind of Hopsin 5."