Netflix

'Full House' V. 'Fuller House': Comparing The Iconic Tanner Family Home Sets

It's been more than 20 years. That couch can't be the same one, right?

It been more than 20 years since I last sat in the Tanner family living room. OK, so maybe I never physically sat in that iconic blue-and-white checkered couch, but television oftentimes has the ability to transcend pixelated screens, and as a kid who grew up on "Full House," "Family Matters" and "Growing Pains," everything I knew about a home -- and most importantly, what one should look like -- I learned from TV.

Once upon a time, all I ever wanted in life was a living room that looked like Danny Tanner's, with its perfect banister and cozy reading nook by the bay window. At six years old, I thought wooden staircases were the pinnacle of successful adulthood. (I still feel a romantic longing for one, even as a city dweller.) Also, that living room was huge. There was so much space for random, fun activities that Jesse and The Rippers were able to throw an impromptu concert there one time.

At that time in my short, malleable life, the Tanner family living room was my American Dream; I was helplessly enamored with it.

Two decades later, and the Tanners have invited me into their home again. Netflix's "Full House" revival series, aptly named "Fuller House," doesn't hit the streaming service until Feb. 26, but through teasers and set photos, we've gotten a sentimental glimpse into the title house, mainly the beloved Tanner family living room and kitchen.

Now, a lot can happen in 20 years. After all, tastes change and advances in technology (hooray for ice makers in refrigerators!) happen. But it's clear that production wanted the sets to feel instantly familiar to older fans, yet updated for modern audiences.

For example, take the familiar Tanner family kitchen. Back in the late '80s and early '90s, that wood paneling was dope. It felt instantly homey. When you saw that kitchen, you expected something delicious to come out of it, like a boot-shaped pastry crust stuffed with turkey. Plus, it was practical. You could bake cookies and do a load of laundry at the same time.

Warner Bros.

Flash-forward to today, and the Tanner kitchen hasn't changed that much. Looking at the kids' artwork hanging on the kitchen island still gives me a case of the warm and fuzzies. There are some obvious upgrades: stainless steel appliances, a hood for the range, a trendy backsplash, granite countertops and (hopefully) a new rug for the dining area. But for the most part, it still feels like home. Perhaps the biggest change is the addition of a mudroom where the laundry used to be. We're not entirely sure how Danny pulled off adding another room to his house, but it looks fresh and modern. However, this means there are now three entryways in this home.

Netflix

And then there's that timeless Tanner living room that I spent years of my life ogling. For me, it represented what a home should look like, from the artwork hanging on the walls to the coveted encyclopedia collection collecting dust in the reading nook. That stained glass window was just the icing on the (vanilla) cake.

Warner Bros.

Today, I standby my childhood assessment; it's still everything I ever wanted in a home. I may not have the same design aesthetic now, but that doesn't mean I don't get sentimental when I see that bay window. The banister hasn't changed, despite a new rug and probably a fresh coat of paint, and while the "Fuller House" set is certainly bigger than its retired predecessor, it still feels homey and warm (even with the brand new track lighting). By far, my favorite part of the room's subtle transformation is how dedicated they were to making the furniture look familiar, but not the same. (But FYI, it's 2016 and your living room is a bazillion square feet, so why do you still have that decades-old, tiny checkered couch?)

Oh, and let's not forget the strange, blue figurine tucked away by the reading nook. He's still there doing his thing... whatever that may be.

Netflix

Welcome home, Tanners. But please, take off your shoes before entering one of your three main doors. You're going to give Danny a heart attack one of these days.

Netflix