Brad Anderson To Direct ‘The Living And The Dead’ Adaptation

Brad Anderson has signed on to direct the film adaptation of “The Living And The Dead,” a graphic novel by writers Todd Livingston & Robert Tinnell and artist Micah Farritor.

Anderson—perhaps best known for his work on “The Machinist” and “Session 9”—has more recently left his mark on TV by directing several episodes of “Fringe.” He is currently directing the horror/thriller “Vanishing on 7th Street” with Hayden Christensen and Thandie Newton.

Mania is reporting that Anderson will direct “The Living And The Dead” for Solipsist Films. Livingston & Tinnell have also written the screenplay adaptation of their graphic novel.

Originally released in 2005 by Speakeasy comics, “The Living And The Dead” takes place in nineteenth century Europe and focuses on a perverse madman who lures his victims to be tortured and killed as part of his twisted “performance art.”

MTV News caught up with “The Living And The Dead” co-writer Robert Tinnell, who revealed that Victor Frankenstein from Mary Shelley’s “Frankenstein” also plays a major role within the story.

“This is about twelve or thirteen years after he had completely destroyed his life and a lot of other lives,” explained Tinnell. “At the point this story starts, he’s just trying to make amends. And the road to hell is paved with good intentions.”

“The Living And The Dead” began as a screenplay by Livingston & Tinnell even before they took it to Speakeasy. The writing duo was also able to adapt their own comic for the screen under the guidance of producers Stephen L’Heureux and Cary Brokaw along with Anderson. And according to Tinnell, the input of the producers ultimately strengthened the project.

“We always felt that our characters had really rich emotional through lines,” related Tinnell. “L’Heureux and Brokaw pushed us. And later when Brad [Anderson] came onto the project, he pushed us to explore the characters even deeper. We kept finding more and more interesting places to take it.”

“I can’t lie,” continued Tinnell. “They made Todd and I better writers. They helped us take our story way, way beyond where it was.”

Does the story of “The Living And The Dead” sound intriguing? Who would you cast as Victor Frankenstein? Let us know what you think in the comment section or on Twitter!