Splash Page Wants To Know: Which ‘Twilight’ Tales Do You Want To See In Comics?

Stephenie Meyer’s “Twilight” has become the largest multi-media franchise of 2008. Comic books are continuing to enjoy a huge resurrection, fueling many of Hollywood’s most anticipated movies from “Watchmen” to “The Avengers” to “G.I. Joe.” So, why isn’t anyone dipping this proverbial peanut butter into the proverbial chocolate?

Splash Page editor Casey Seijas just published an interesting article asking the same question that was posed to me a few weeks ago at L.A’s TwilightLive : Why aren’t there any “Twilight” graphic novels?

In my opinion, it’s a no-brainer. First off, comics would help build a larger male fanbase – perhaps the greatest obstacle to “Twilight” world domination as a franchise. Secondly, Stephenie Meyer’s novels have a huge cast of beloved supporting characters, many with lengthy backstories that have been barely touched upon. Then there’s the fact that “Twilight” fans love to read, and would flood comic stores nationwide with new customers who’d undoubtedly grab a few other books while they were shopping.

The next question is an obvious one: Which graphic novel storylines would you want to see? In my opinion, Meyer would be smart to oversee her franchise like George Lucas – selecting talented artists to interpret her world, then doling out a character here or a timeline period there to be used as their playground. Some would work better than others – and as Summit moves ahead with creating “New Moon” and the other films, they could plunder any brilliant story elements that the increasingly busy Meyer deemed canon-worthy.

I’d love to see a slickly-illustrated, “Jonah Hex”-like comic detailing Jasper Whitlock’s adventures during the Civil War. It would also be beyond cool to see a “From Hell”-like book set in 17th century England, portraying a young Carlisle Cullen’s experiences alongside his pastor father, hunting down the supernatural (or the time Carlisle met Babe Ruth). Perhaps another comic could fill in the blanks and tell us more about Edward’s “New Moon” storyline, testing out a few ideas before the cameras start rolling. If Stephenie Meyer and her reps chose the proper artists and writers, it seems as though the sky is the limit.

And in case you missed it, be sure to check out our story asking the question: Where are the “Twilight” comic books?

Would you buy “Twilight” graphic novels? Which storylines would you like to see spun-off into their very own books?