Would You Wear These Dresses Made Entirely Of Cheese?

Dresses made of melted cheese.
Photo: Courtesy of South West News Service

So many puns. So many good puns swimming through our heads at the site of a cheese dress (GRATE EXPECTATIONS? FROMAGE HOMAGE?) that we know once we get started, we may never stop. So let us get the requisite joke out of the way. If we paired this with Gaga’s VMA dress, we would get a delicious cheeseburger (>for your nails?!). , a UK-based dairy company, took one look at the meat frock and thought—hell, we could do that. So they tapped young guns at Bath Spa University to create couture made entirely out of fromage, taking the Lady as inspiration. Honors Textile Design students have produced five items for “Versa Cheese” using Pilgrim’s Choice staples like Vintage and Extra Mature (as opposed to more childish) cheddar, heat molding the cheeses and embellishing ball gowns with melted cheddar or floral flourishes made of… well, cheese.

What makes us a little goose-bumpy is thinking of these “dresses” outside, in the sun, being worn by real human people. The smell, one would think, is probably rather rank, and the shelf life of each garment has to be short (especially without refrigeration). With nearly one entire ton of cheddar used by the students, they also presented accessories, like a handbag and the original item, “Jimmy Cheese” (GET IT?) shoes (seriously. While the dresses have a strange orange-y beauty to them, the shoes just look like food art). So, no—we probably would not wear said cheesy dresses.

Yet, like the meat dress, this isn’t meant to be any sort of sartorial statement. While Gaga was symbolically stating that she wasn’t meat (or something), the cheesy dresses seem to be significantly less charged. What is really interesting, we think, is the fact that these young seamstresses and seamsters are experimenting with bizarre, biodegradable material. In other words, once they master Leicester, silk, suede, and leather will be a piece of… well, you know.

Detail of cheese purse.
Photo: Courtesy of South West News Service