Comics Blogger Upset That I’m Not A Woman Who Helps Comics

Sometimes, I like to eat lunch.

While eating lunch, I prefer not think about video games, if just for a a few minutes.  Instead, I check out some blogs that don’t involve games. Since I like reading comics, I check out a comics blog or two.

I did today. And… wait… comics blogger Heidi MacDonald is taking shots at me?

In a post about the dearth of female creators in the mainstream comics industry?


MacDonald was lamenting the lack of prominent female writers in mainstream comics and the lack of much celebration for superstar female creators. To sharpen her argument, she wrote the following paragraph, emphasis all in the original:

While indie and manga scenes have given rise to dozens of notable women creators on all levels, there are still only a tiny handful of mainstream female “superstars.” For instance, the New York Comic-Con has announced dozens of featured guests – including the tech writer for Newsweek, the marketing director for Bandai, and the guy who covers video games for MTV News — and only two women, Barbara Canepa and Colleen Doran. Now, Canepa co-ccreated one of the most successful properties worldwide over the last 10 years — W.I.T.C.H. — and Colleen is Amerca’s Sweetheart, and I think both of them have given a little bit more to the industry than the guy who covers video games for MTV News. No offense. In fact I can think iof [sic] a dozen women who have done more for comics than the guy who covers video games for MTV news.

Wow. And I thought Soulja Boy thrashed me badly last Tuesday.

I too can think of a dozen women who have done more for comics than me as well, including one Heidi MacDonald.

At the New York Comic-Con in 2006, MacDonald even helped me — the guy who covers video games for MTV News — meet some other women who contributed more to comics than I did. Those introductions led to the one article I’ve written for MTV News in my 3 1/2 years here that wasn’t about video games.

I should mention why I am going to be at New York Comic-Con. The Comic-Con has traditionally included video games and other non-comics entertainment (movies, trading card games, etc.). I was invited to helm a panel alongside my frequent writing partner, N’Gai Croal of Newsweek, to participate in a track of conference programming dedicated to games. Video games are undeniably an evolving creative form that shares a good portion of its audience with those who read comics. N’Gai and I are planning a live version of our Vs. Mode critical debates, probably with some gaming industry professionals involved. We hope, as always, to do our part to get more people thinking intelligently about video games. The panel will be held in early February during the 2/6-2/8 convention. We’ll have more details on it in January.

Back to MacDonald’s point: I agree. Video games face a similar issue. There are few known superstar female creators in the industry. There are few women known at all for making games. I hope that changes, as I hope it does for comics as well.

At least I wasn’t invited to talk at MoCCA, the New York comic convention that does always feature many female comics creators. I only go to that one to shop.

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