MTV Movie Awards Uncensored? Great Moments In F-Bomb History

This year's MTV Movie Awards were particularly epic. Why, you ask? I can sum it up in one word, really: f--k. Many, many, many, many F-bombs were dropped this evening, perhaps not a record number for television but a lot nonetheless.

Ultimately it's just a word, but "f--k" has a very colorful history in entertainment. A documentary was even made exploring its life, appropriately titled "F--k." And while I can't show you that doc here, I can guide you through a few of the notable F-bomb moments in entertainment history.

"Catcher in the Rye"

While it perhaps wasn't the first occurrence of f--k in print, J.D. Salinger's use of the word in his 1951 novel "Catcher in the Rye" is one of the earliest. It continues to be a frequently banned book in high schools for a variety of reasons, the F-bomb included. Really though, what better way to get a young kid excited about reading than to hand him or her a great work of literature that also happens to be littered with profanity.

"M*A*S*H"

Robert Altman is responsible for some of the finest films in cinema's history, but did you know he's also responsible for Hollywood's first big screen f--k? Most people associate "M*A*S*H" with the long-running TV series, but it was actually a book first and then an Altman film. And it was that film which, amidst the bodies piling up at a mobile hospital during the Korean War, featured the first F-bomb in film.

"Scarface"

Brian De Palma's 1983 film "Scarface," for all of its campier elements, is a classic. Al Pacino's Tony Montana is quite the badass. He's also ridiculously profane. "Scarface" features a whopping 206 F-bomb drops. That's a lot. Even in comparison to the 2010 MTV Movie Awards.

"The Sopranos"

HBO's hit series "The Sopranos" was all about showing viewers the challenges of being a ranking mafia associate while balancing the daily pressures of raising and maintaining a family. It was also peppered with profanity. I can't embed it here, but some enterprising soul edited every F-bomb occurrence on the show into one lengthy montage video.

Video Games: First And Most

The very first occurrence of f--k in a video game was the 1995 adventure game, "The Orion Conspiracy." Despite the profanity -- and a number of other questionable bits of content -- the game only received a Teen rating from the Entertainment Software Ratings Board. Also noteworthy is "House of the Dead: Overkill," a 2009 Wii title that features 189 uses of the damnable word. That's a lot of f--k!