‘Logan’s Run’ And The Curious Case Of Carl Erik Rinsch

For well over 10 years now, numerous Hollywood producers and directors have done their best to remake “Logan’s Run,” the classic 1976 science fiction film about a dystopian future where no one is allowed to live past the age of 30. The film has passed through capable hands belonging to Bryan Singer, Joseph Kosinski and others. Today, a new director is reporting to Carousel to try his luck at renewing the remake: Carl Erik Rinsch.

Rinsch presents a curious case. While he’s an unknown quantity to the mainstream moviegoing populace, the filmmaker is a red hot commodity in the Hollywood circuit these days. Best known for his work as a commercial director, Rinsch — considered a protege of director Ridley Scott’s — has seen his name attached to a number of high profile projects in recent weeks and months.

Not too long ago, Rinsch was tapped to direct “Alien 5,” the upcoming prequel to Ridley Scott’s original space-set horror film. Fox was reportedly uncomfortable with handing their coveted franchise’s keys to an unknown director like Rinsch, paving the way for Scott to get behind the camera as both producer and director.

But the loss of “Alien 5″ was hardly an end to the interest in Rinsch. Since then, the filmmaker has signed on to direct Universal’s samurai epic “47 Ronin” and the studio’s “Creature from the Black Lagoon” remake. Additionally, Rinsch’s short film “The Gift” electrified Hollywood executives and provoked a bidding war over the project, one that Rinsch is reportedly pausing as he continues to refine the story.

Now, Rinsch is attached to “Logan’s Run,” his fifth high profile attachment since the initial “Alien 5″ rumors started almost one year ago to the day. With both “Creature” and “Ronin” on his plate, there’s really no evidence to suggest that Rinsch is the type of juggler capable of balancing both projects along with “Logan’s Run” and even “The Gift.” Seeing as “Logan’s Run” has already gone through so many failed iterations, Rinsch’s attachment could just be another notch in that unending belt.

But that’s not what really matters here. Instead, the very fact that Hollywood is taking such an interest in the budding filmmaker should set off some very loud alarms that Rinsch is a director to watch. Whether he bursts on the scene with “Logan’s Run,” “47 Ronin,” “Creature from the Black Lagoon,” “The Gift” or something else entirely, there’s no question that Rinsch is going to make a big splash sometime soon. But one crucial question remains: when Rinsch makes that splash, will he sink or will he swim?

Tell us what you think of the curious case of Carl Rinsch and his prospects as the “Logan’s Run” director in the comments or on Twitter!