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A Viral Poem Reminds Us To #PrayForParis And Pray For The Entire World

'It is not Paris we should pray for. It is the world'

Karuna Ezara Parikh is a blogger from India whose writing has tackled good books, Frida Kahlo and now, Friday's horrific terrorist attacks in Paris. You might have seen Karuna's latest Instagram post pop up on your Facebook feed today.

It's a prose-poem that calls attention to the social media reactions that sprung up in the wake of the horrible evening that left nearly 130 people dead.

I woke this morning deeply disturbed by the news from #Paris, but more amazed by the attention it received on social media. I understand Paris is a beloved and familiar space for a lot of people, but it troubled me that #Beirut, a city my father grew up in, had received so little attention after the horrific bombings two days earlier. It also troubled me that #Baghdad, a place I have absolutely no connection with, received even less attention after the senseless bombing that took place there last week. Worst of all, I found the understanding of the refugee crisis skewed and simplistic. If you've been following the journeys of the people leaving their homes around the world right now, perhaps you'll understand why the words #SyrianRefugeeCrisis are just as devastating as #PrayForParis. It's time to pray for humanity. It is time to make all places beloved. It's time to pray for the world.

A photo posted by Karuna E Parikh (@karunaezara) on

Along with this powerful message came an equally powerful caption: "I woke this morning deeply disturbed by the news from #Paris, but more amazed by the attention it received on social media. I understand Paris is a beloved and familiar space for a lot of people, but it troubled me that #Beirut, a city my father grew up in, had received so little attention after the horrific bombings two days earlier. It also troubled me that #Baghdad, a place I have absolutely no connection with, received even less attention after the senseless bombing that took place there last week. Worst of all, I found the understanding of the refugee crisis skewed and simplistic. If you've been following the journeys of the people leaving their homes around the world right now, perhaps you'll understand why the words #SyrianRefugeeCrisis are just as devastating as #PrayForParis. It's time to pray for humanity. It is time to make all places beloved. It's time to pray for the world."

Karuna refers to a suicide bombing that killed 41 people in the Lebanon capital on Thursday. The Islamic State (also called ISIS and ISIL), the same group that claimed responsibility for the Parisian attacks, has also said it was behind the Beirut killings, BBC reports. And also on Friday, a bombing in Baghdad, Iraq claimed 26 lives and injured "dozens" more, according to Al Jazeera.

Karuna's message -- which has 67,200 likes on Facebook and nearly 21,000 likes on Instagram -- is clear: "Say a prayer for Paris by all means,/ but pray more,/ for the world that does not have a prayer,/ for those who no longer have a home to defend."

H/T BuzzFeed