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Jennifer Lawrence Just Got Raw And Honest About Her Pay Gap With 'Dudes'

'I’m over trying to find the 'adorable' way to state my opinion and still be likable.'

With the exception of a few scathing truthbombs dropped in the wake of last year's nude photo hack, Jennifer Lawrence generally keeps quiet on trendy feminist topics.

But don't let that make you think she doesn't have anything to say.

Because boy, does she ever -- and after being asked by Lena Dunham to share her thoughts on Hollywood's pay gap, Lawrence penned an essay for the latest issue of Dunham's "Lenny" newsletter, in which she got very, very real about the ridiculous discrepancy between her pay and her male co-stars'.

"When the Sony hack happened and I found out how much less I was being paid than the lucky people with dicks, I didn’t get mad at Sony. I got mad at myself," Lawrence admitted. "I failed as a negotiator because I gave up early. I didn’t want to keep fighting over millions of dollars that, frankly, due to two franchises, I don’t need."

Although the actress is the first to note that her million-dollar problems aren't exactly relatable, the reason why she didn't push for better pay will be frustratingly familiar to a lot of women:

"I would be lying if I didn’t say there was an element of wanting to be liked that influenced my decision to close the deal without a real fight. I didn’t want to seem 'difficult' or 'spoiled,'" she explained. And on that front, Jennifer Lawrence knows she's not alone.

"Are we socially conditioned to behave this way?" she asked. "We’ve only been able to vote for what, 90 years? I’m seriously asking — my phone is on the counter and I’m on the couch, so a calculator is obviously out of the question. Could there still be a lingering habit of trying to express our opinions in a certain way that doesn’t 'offend' or 'scare' men?"

Jokes aside, the answer to that question would seem to be yes, and the problems it creates aren't easy to solve. Women who don't ask for more money won't get it, obviously -- but even women who do often get passed over, because being an aggressive negotiator is seen as a character flaw if you're female.

Columbia Pictures

But if there's a way to close the wage gap, it's probably J-Law's approach: To use her voice the way she wants to, and to hell with anyone who's not okay with that.

"I’m over trying to find the 'adorable' way to state my opinion and still be likable!" she concluded. "F--- that. I don’t think I’ve ever worked for a man in charge who spent time contemplating what angle he should use to have his voice heard. It’s just heard."