Black Lips Mess With Your Sense Of Time In The New 'Justice After All' Video

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Black Lips use ALL the video ever to travel through time in their new clip.

The first image in Black Lips' "Justice After All" video advertises a show on Mar. 7, 2014, which is helpful, because if you haven't heard of the band (or of Deerhunter, who they used to play with), you may not have any idea when the clip takes place -- it could easily be anywhere from 1960 to 2050. The video's mix of film, videotape, and digital camera makes it feel like a trip through the ages.

The Atlanta band has been playing timeless, raw, fuzzed-out, vaguely psychedelic punk music that hasn't gone out of style since their 2003 self-titled debut. (Their latest release, Underneath The Rainbow, co-produced by Patrick Carney of The Black Keys, was released this week.)

"Justice After All" is no exception. It's a no-frills, gritty, blues-punk track that wouldn't feel out of place playing in the messy dive bars of any decade. The video is mixed with footage from a gig in their hometown, the band running down streets (and occasionally falling over), backstage scenes, and images of fans in such a way as to keep the temporal sleight of hand going as well.

Director Andy Capper, who also shot The Black Lips' "Bad Kids" and ""Go Out & Get It," explained the effect to Noisey: "I guess the inspiration for the look and feel of the video came from the Husker Du track 'Don't Want To Know If You Are Lonely,' which was shot on VHS. And so Danilo [Parra] bought an old Panasonic from eBay and we mixed it with Canon c300 stuff. I wanted it to be a cross between the intimate home made VHS stuff and then have black and white widescreen steadicam shots."

The band is in the midst of a lengthy world tour that brings them to Los Angeles on Friday, as well as Europe later this summer. That's another thing that hasn't gone out of style for bands like this: working your butt off on the road.

+ Watch Black Lips' "Justice After All" video.

Photo credit: Black Lips