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Here’s Where Kanye Stands On All The Major Presidential Issues, Bruh

#YeezyForPresident2020

Last night, American history was made when Kanye West announced during his Vanguard Award acceptance speech that he would be running for president in 2020.

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We all know and love Kanye the creative virtuoso, but how well do we know Kanye the political candidate? We put together a list of where 'Ye stands on the biggest presidential issues. (You're welcome, America).

  • LGBTQ Rights

    Ye has always been outspoken about his support for the LGBTQ community. Ten years ago, Kanye sat down for a now-legendary interview with MTV's Sway Calloway in which he called for an end to homophobia in hip-hop.

  • On (Other) Politicians

    “I believe that utopia is actually possible -- but we're led by the least noble, the least dignified, the least tasteful, the dumbest, and the most political. So in no way am I a politician—I'm usually at my best politically incorrect and very direct.” -- Speech At Harvard University's Graduate School of Design, November 2013

  • On Police Brutality

    "I say 'f--k the police that’s how I treat 'em/We buy our way out of jail but we can’t buy freedom." -- "All Falls Down," "The College Dropout," 2004

  • On Income Inequality

    "As rich people, our focus shouldn’t be on how we get a new Phantom, how we get a bigger house. Our focus should be on, How do we help the middle to the lower class to have a better life?" -- Interview with The Breakfast Club, February 2015

  • On Racism

    "Don’t let them make you believe that I’m crazy/See that’s the magic of racism, it works on itself/We hate each other, screw each other, kill each other/When we can’t kill nobody else" -- Birthday Bash, Atlanta, GA, June 2015

  • On Women's Rights

    In an interview with Vanity Fair in February of 2015, Kanye described his evolved attitude towards women:

    "In the past, West has been criticized for misogynistic lyrics and music videos. Now the Monster rapper has learned the error of his ways. 'God has an amazing way of teaching people,' he said.

    For West, God taught him a valuable lesson about respecting women by dropping him into the Kardashian-Jenner household: 'Literally for two years I lived with all alpha females and a daughter, you know? [Laughs] So I had to learn to really do what my mother taught me, and become the man she always knew I could be, and bow as a creative.'

    West has taken his lessons well and incorporated them into his work in the fashion world. 'Before, when I drove down the street I would see these brands and think they're really desirable for a girl who would dream of one day walking in that runway show or something like that,' said West. “And that's a, you know, dated view and degrading to women, in a way.'"

  • On Education

    "Now even though I went to college and dropped out of school quick/I always had a Ph.D.: a Pretty Huge D--k" -- "Breathe In, Breathe Out," "The College Dropout," 2004

  • On Immigration

    In 2010, Kanye and a group of musicians including Zach De La Rocha, Juanes and the members of Cypress Hill formed a collective called "the Sound Strike," in which they agreed to not perform in Arizona as a way of protesting the state's strict immigration laws.

  • On The Future

    "What can we do for each other to make life easier, to make life doper for our kids, you know, as they grow. We were born into a broken world and we’re like the clean-up crew." -- Video for Time Magazine's 100 Most Influential People, April 2015

  • On Our Use Of Non-Eco Friendly Materials

    "I hate when I'm on a flight and I wake up with a water bottle next to me like oh great now I gotta be responsible for this water bottle." -- A Tweet that has now (regrettably) been deleted

  • On Youth

    "Listen to the kids, bruh." -- MTV Video Music Awards, August 2015

You've got our vote, Yeezy. HMU if you need a campaign manager.

MTV