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See The Moments From The Gay Rights Movement That Made Nationwide Marriage Equality Possible

From Stonewall to DOMA, the tireless efforts of committed LGBT activists have proven the power of protest in the fight for equality.

From the Stonewall Riots in 1969 that demanded an end to police brutality against the LGBT community, to the massive National Marches in support of gay visibility and gay rights on Washington, D.C. in 1979 and 1993, to countless demonstrations in support of pro-LGBT legislation at the state level throughout the years, the tireless efforts of committed LGBT activists have proven the power of protest.

Here's a look at some momentous moments in the history of the gay right's movement that has brought us to the steps of The Supreme Court, and the possibility of marriage equality a reality for everyone.

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1969: Outside the Stonewall Inn, a gay bar in Greenwich Village, New York, a crowd fights back against police raids and brutality.

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1970: Citizens march in a Gay and Lesbian Pride Parade in Boston, MA.

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1970: Marches participate in a Gay liberation rally in New York City.

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1978: Protesters rally in support of the Gay Rights Bill, which guarantees equal rights in employment, housing and public services, in New York.

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1978: In Denver, CO., locals join the Lesbian/Gay Freedom March to protest police harassment and discrimination against the LGBT community.

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1979: New Yorkers march in a Gay Rights March up Fifth Avenue.

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1979: Reverend John Kuiper (right), the first gay man in America to win the right to adopt a child, marches with his partner Roger Hooverman in New York City.

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1982: Lesbian Rights March, New York

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1983: Parents and friends of LGBT activists march in the 1983 Gay Pride Parade in New York City.

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1987: LGBT rights activists protest the visit of anti-gay Pope John Paul II in San Francisco.

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Members Of Act Up's Gay Pride Coalition demand action on the AIDs epidemic during a 1988 Gay Pride march.

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1993: About 300,000 protestors march in protest of rising rates of LGBT hate crimes, "Don't Ask, Don't Tell," and ongoing discrimination in the workplace.

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1993: Activists yell at anti-gay counter-demonstrators along the gay pride parade route in Washington, D.C.

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1993: A protester stands on a pile of signs that read, "End discrimination! Lift the Military Ban" in Washington, D.C.

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1993: A protester speaks out against Bill Clinton's new "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" Law, New York City.

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1994: The 1994 International March on the United Nations to Affirm the Human Rights of Lesbian and Gay People in New York City commemorates the 25th anniversary of the Stonewall Riots.

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1994: In New York City, a protester is arrested after crossing police lines in the International March on the United Nations to Affirm the Human Rights of Lesbian and Gay People.

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A group of protesters stage a die-in at a 1996 Act Up protest of the GOP.

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2004: Supporters of marriage equality rally at the State Capitol Building in Salem, Oregon.

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2004: Supporters of marriage equality protest outside the State House in Boston, Massachusetts.

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2005: Eight-year-old Tyla Sharp-Bishop and her two moms rally in support of marriage equality at the California Supreme Court building in San Francisco, California.

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2006: Supporters of marriage equality demonstrate outside the state Supreme Court in Trenton, New Jersey.

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2008: Supporters of marriage equality rally outside the California Supreme Court in San Francisco, California.

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2013: Marriage equality supporters rally outside the U.S. Supreme Court to urge the repeal California's Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) in Washington, D.C.

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2013: Protesters celebrate the Supreme Court's repeal of DOMA in Washington, D.C.

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2015: Protesters rally in front of the U.S. Supreme Court on the day of the opening arguments in Obergefell v. Hodges, the case that will decide whether same-sex marriage is legal across the U.S., in Washington, D.C.