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Why Are All These Famous People Talking About Being Different?

Normal is boring.

If the 2015 awards show season were to be encapsulated in one word, it would undoubtedly be "different." Not because the ceremonies themselves are that divergent -- no. But because that word has been on the lips of myriad winners this year -- winners urging everyone out there who doesn't feel like everyone else to remain that way.

"When I was little, like Maleficent, I was told that I was different," Angelina Jolie said on stage at this past weekend's Kids' Choice Awards as she accepted the prize for Best Villain. "And then one day I realized something -- something I hope you all realize. Different is good. ... Don't ever try to be less than what you are -- and when someone tells you that you are different, smile and hold your head up high and be proud."

Kids' Choice Awards

That (very true) sentiment was apparently catching, because at Sunday's iHeartRadio Music Awards, Justin Timblerlake basically echoed it during his acceptance speech for his Innovator Award. Buzzfeed very nicely GIF'd that out:

Jolie and Timberlake, however, were not the first to invoke the word this year -- perhaps the most touching use came via Graham Moore, who took home the Oscar for Best Adapted Screenplay for “The Imitation Game."

"When I was 16-years-old, I tried to kill myself because I felt weird and I felt different, and I felt like I did not belong,” Moore said during his speech. "And now I’m standing here, and so I would like this moment to be for this kid out there who feels like she’s weird or she’s different or she doesn’t fit in anywhere. Yes, you do. I promise you do. Stay weird, stay different and then, when it’s your turn, and you are standing on this stage, please pass the same message to the next person who comes along."

So there you have it, guys. Everyone struggles with feelings of belonging -- famous actresses, powerhouse musicians and genius writers alike. So the next time someone calls you "different," just start working on your own acceptance speech.