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Amber Rose Is On To Something -- Why The F--k Are Girls Still Calling Each Other Sluts?

On this week's episode of "Braless," Laci Green goes all in on slut-shaming and the Amber Rose/Khloe Kardashian controversy.

On this week's episode of "Braless," Laci Green tackles something almost every woman has experienced: Slut-shaming.

"Slut shaming is interesting," says Laci. "It’s when we call women 'sluts', 'whores', 'hos', 'skanks', 'thots.' It’s implying that they’re 'dirty' or 'used up' for having sex - or for even being perceived as having sex. Meanwhile guys are 'the man' for doing the same thing."

She then goes on to note that, "Slut-shame is hurled mostly at women, a lot of the time BY WOMEN."

Yeah, WHAT IS UP WITH THAT?

Whether it's Khloé Kardashian criticizing Amber Rose's past life as a stripper, or two college buddies joking around about each other's exploits, women still use female sexuality and the concept of being "impure" as an insult they can lob at each other.

"It's the idea that there are good girls - proper, classy, virginal," says Laci. "And there are bad girls - trashy, out of line, too sexual."

But what exactly is it about perceived promiscuity that women find so troubling? Maybe it has something to do with the definition...

Check out Dictionary.com's entry:

Slut

1. an immoral or dissolute woman; prostitute.

2. A dirty, slovenly woman.

Yikes! No wonder being called a slut really effing hurts - no one wants to be called immoral or dirty. But these words seem to represent something much broader than a woman who likes do get her groove on. What they might actually signify is a woman who is the "other" -- meaning, someone you don't want to identify with, because you don't want people to think you're anything like her.

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Just like "ratchet," "trashy," "basic," and "bimbo," are used to definte women we want to think we're better than, slut is not an actual representation of a woman's character, but rather the social desires of the person using the word.

"One of the easiest ways a girl can represent herself as a 'good girl' is by labeling someone else's sexuality as 'bad,'" wrote Dr.Kathryn Stamoulis in a 2012 Psychology Today article about slut-shaming, "It’s just like the classic example of a boy calling another boy 'gay' in the locker room because he thinks if he shows disdain for homosexuality, there is no way anyone could possibly think he is gay."

But guess what: Many people who use slut-shaming as a weapon against women are actually more like the women they diss than they probably want to admit.

In 2013, a study at Cornell asked 751 students to rate aspects of an (imaginary) woman's character -- like whether she would be a good friend, or if she was smart or not -- based on how many people she had slept with in her early 20s. When the imaginary woman (who the study called "Joan") had slept with 20 or more people, the rating of her character dropped significantly. Even female participants in the study who confessed to being very sexually active themselves said that Joan was probably not a great person. Ouch.

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"What surprised us in this study is how unaccepting promiscuous women were of other promiscuous women when it came to friendships," said Head Researcher Zhana Vrangalova. "These are the very people one would think they could turn to for support."

Vrangalova is actually on to something. This idea of "support" seems like something all women can benefit from, regardless of their sexual histories. After all, the pill has been around for almost 65 years, and we've done the math and confirmed that 99% of sexually active women use birth control at some point in their lives. Just last year, Beyoncé put out a song about doing it in the backseat of a limo, and everyone still thinks she's classy as hell. We're far past the era of thinking that women don't enjoy sex, so maybe it's time to no longer be surprised, or worse, offended, when they're actually sexual.

And isn't there something about the world “slut” that just feels extra violent — like every time it’s used, it turns back the clock on how far we’ve come in the fight for equality? Just like Tina Fey’s character says in “Mean Girls,” calling each other sluts and whores makes it okay for guys to call us sluts and whores - which seems like something we're all trying to put an end to.