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New Study Finds A Third Of College Men Would Engage In Forcible Sex If It Wasn't Defined As 'Rape'

Despite a small sample size, a new study from Violence and Gender had some disturbing findings.

This just in: 1 in 3 college men don't understand that forcible intercourse is actually rape.

In a new paper called "Denying Rape but Endorsing Forceful Intercourse: Exploring Differences Among Responders" published by the journal Violence and Gender, approximately 32 percent of study participants said they would have "intentions to force a woman to sexual intercourse" if no one found out and there would be no consequences.

However, when asked if they would "rape" a women if there were no consequences, only 13.6 percent said yes. It's also worth noting that the sample size wasn't very diverse— of the men surveyed in this particular instance 90% identified as Caucasian, plus they all attend the same college so it's plausible that they come from similar backgrounds.

But, what does this survey tell us? There are a lot of men out there who still don't see forcible sex as an act of rape.

The researchers also noted the attitudes of each responder regarding forced sex and how they regard women. Men who readily admitted intentions of "rape" displayed "resentment, bitterness, rejection sensitivity, and paranoia about women's motives," while those who opted-in to the "force" terminology displayed "callous sexual attitudes" but no hostility towards women.

An excerpt from the study's findings:

Given that callous sexual attitudes permit violence and consider women as passive sexual objects, it follows that for men who endorse these, sexual aggression becomes an appropriate and accepted expression of masculinity. In this sense, using force to obtain intercourse does not become an act of rape, but rather an expression of hypermasculinity, which may be thought of as a desirable disposition in certain subcultures.

Now, the sample size was nowhere near representative of the male human race as a whole as a mere 86 participants were surveyed, but the findings still open up a platform for discussion that can potentially help college students understand the full spectrum of what constitutes "rape."

Pledge to take a stand against sexual assault over at It's On Us.