Pussy Riot Dresses Up As Flapper Witches To Protest Russian Oppression

The Russian punk collective is out with their newest video.

One year after Pussy Riot members Maria Alyokhina and Nadezhda Tolokonnikova were freed from prison via a new amnesty law courtesy of President Vladimir V. Putin, the Russian punk rock collective is at it again with a new protest video, titled, "Witches of Pussy Riot clean Manezhku."

The collective released the video late Monday in the U.S. in anticipation of the sentencing of anti-Putin opposition leader Alexei Navalny and his brother, Oleg. The pair was found guilty Tuesday (December 30) of stealing roughly half a million dollars in a complicated fraud case, according to The Hollywood Reporter, the true purpose of which Alexei has said is an attempt to suppress opposition. Both he and his brother were sentenced to three and a half years in prison.

According to The Guardian, Navalny faced 10 years in prison, but was given a suspended sentence. His brother's sentencing, however, was the most shocking, as it points to a return to the Soviet-era tradition of meting out punishments to the relatives of its enemies. Oleg was never involved in anti-Putin opposition.

Pussy Riot's video, which is a lot more polished than previous works -- such as their anti-Putin “punk prayer," filmed at Moscow’s Christ the Saviour Cathedral -- calls for protestors to gather in a public square near Moscow's Red Square tonight to voice their dissent.

Pussy Riot was previously arrested for “hooliganism” after performing their "punk prayer" in 2012. They were sentenced to two years in prison. Yekaterina Samutsevich was given a suspended sentence on appeal, but Maria Alyokhina and Nadezhda Tolokonnikova were released in 2013 in what they believed to be an effort to improve Russia's image before the Sochi Olympics.