Joan Jett Still Loves Rock 'N' Roll

And she's got a new greatest hits LP coming out as a reminder to fans.

People responded enthusiastically the last time Joan Jett professed her love for her job. Her massive 1982 hit expressing that

sentiment, "I Love Rock N Roll," logged a total of seven weeks at #1 on the charts.

Without seeming ungrateful about the success of her low-slung guitar anthem, Jett wants her fans, friends and admirers, not

to mention those who have yet to discover her snarling leather-and-mace sound, to remember there's plenty more where that

came from.

"For me, what I want to get across," said Jett, calling from her hometown of New York on Friday, "is that even though 'I

Love Rock N Roll' was such a huge hit for me, people forget there were, like 10-11 other Top-40 hits we had too."

Jett's

remedy is Fit to Be Tied: Great Hits By Joan Jett and the Blackhearts, due out today, a 15-song primer on Jett's last 15 years of rock 'n' roll high school. "Most people know where they were when

HREF="http://media.addict.com/music/Jett,_Joan/I_Love_Rock_And_Roll.ram">'I Love Rock N Roll' (RealAudio

excerpt) became a big hit," said 37-year-old Jett, who began her rock life at age 15 in the Runaways, a mid-'70s band fronted

by singer Cherie Currie that also featured Lita Ford. That ragged, punky all-female group was heaped with criticism for

crunching out the same type of brash, "un-ladylike" rock that many of Jett's contemporaries and collaborators in bands such as Bikini Kill and L7 are praised for in the '90s.

Corin Tucker, singer/guitarist for punk trio Sleater-Kinney, said she was "definitely" influenced by Jett's take-no-prisoners

style. "It was the way she presented herself as being a musician, played guitar and wrote music that was interesting to me,"

said Tucker, 25. "Because so many women musicians are the front-person singer, and are basically there to be sex symbols.

She was really sexy and tough in a way that had her in control. Beyond just her stage presence, her songs are really rock in a

classic way and really tough. It was nice to know that women don't always have to sing about flowers and herbs and be really

folky."

Additionally, Jett was a conduit to learning about other kinds of music for a young kid without a way underground, Tucker

said. "When I was really young and didn't have access to underground music written by women," she explained, "Joan Jett

was definitely a mainstream woman who rocked."

For Jett, though, those crazed early days of the '80s may seem like a long time ago. "It was like, people were chasing their nieces and nephews around trying to get them to turn the song off," said Jett, who

admitted that the whirlwind time was hard to remember. "You get something like that and it's so rare. It wasn't only #1, but

for two months! Which is a real difficult feat. Imagine the immensity of that for that time. We were virtually a garage band, and happily so."

Her new hits collection contains the songs: "Bad Reputation," "Light of Day," "Do You Wanna Touch Me? (Oh Yeah!),"

"Roadrunner," "I Love Rock N Roll," "Victim of Circumstance," "Everyday People," "I Hate Myself For Loving You,"

"Crimson and Clover," "Fake Friends," "Make Believe," "Cherry Bomb," "Little Liar" and her rocked-up cover of the

Mary Tyler Moore show theme song "Love is All Around."

The first single from the album will be an alternate mix of the band's cover of Sly and the Family Stone's "Everyday People."

Even while compiling the album, which also contains the new song

HREF="http://media.addict.com/music/Jett,_Joan/World_Of_Denial.ram">"World of Denial" (RealAudio excerpt),

Jett said she never consciously tried to look back on her career and assess her place in the rock world.

"Part of doing this is just the desire to keep doing what I do," she said. "I love to play music and I like to sell records. What

makes you able to stay in the public consciousness and people not get tired of you, I don't know."

[Tues., Nov. 18, 1997, 9 a.m. PDT]